Thomas d'Aquin en questions

 
 
Charte du forum
 
 Nouveau sujet  |  Remonter au début  |  Retour au sujet  |  Rechercher  |  S'identifier   Nouveau sujet  |  Anciens sujets 
 Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: JeuneCherchant 
Date:   06-03-2018 15:12

Bonjour à tous,

Je suis tombé sur un article intéressant d'un philosophe néo-Aristotélicien ( https://rdingthorsson.wordpress.com/scientific-essentialism/project-description/ ) indiquant que la distinction acte/potentiel implique une vision unidirectionelle des actions; or, selon l'auteur, ce point est scientifiquement falsifié (« However, according to modern physics, unidirectional actions do not exist; all interactions are perfectly reciprocal (Resnick, Halliday & Krane 2001). »). Pourriez-vous me donner votre avis sur la question ?

Merci !

Un jeune cherchant.



Message modifié (06-03-2018 15:12)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Stagire 
Date:   06-03-2018 17:20

JeuneCherchant a écrit:

> Je suis tombé sur un article intéressant d'un philosophe
> néo-Aristotélicien (
> https://rdingthorsson.wordpress.com/scientific-essentialism/project-description/
> ) indiquant que la distinction acte/potentiel implique une
> vision unidirectionelle des actions; or, selon l'auteur, ce
> point est scientifiquement falsifié (« However, according to
> modern physics, unidirectional actions do not exist; all
> interactions are perfectly reciprocal (Resnick, Halliday &
> Krane 2001). »
). Pourriez-vous me donner votre avis sur la
> question ?

Un bon «avis sur la question» se trouve à : Aristote, Physique
LIVRE III: Chapitre 3: Le mouvement est l'acte du moteur dans le mobile.

Bref, l'auteur de l'article n'a pas compris la doctrine d'Aristote sur l'être mobile.

Cordialement



Message modifié (08-03-2018 19:28)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Delaporte 
Date:   12-03-2018 14:01

Cher Jeune Cherchant,

Je me suis permis de traduire l'article proposé, de marquer en gras les passages qui me semblaient essentiels et d'ajouter des notes en commentaire. Vous trouverez le résultat en cliquant ICI.

Cordialement

L'animateur

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: JeuneCherchant 
Date:   12-03-2018 15:48

Monsieur Delaporte,

Merci beaucoup pour votre traduction et vos notes, qui me seront très utiles.

Je m'attelle à la lecture de ce pas.

Cordialement,

Un jeune cherchant.

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Stagire 
Date:   12-03-2018 17:29

Cher animateur,

> Je me suis permis de traduire l'article proposé, de marquer en
> gras les passages qui me semblaient essentiels et d'ajouter des
> notes en commentaire. Vous trouverez le résultat en cliquant
> ICI.

Je relève : «Les savants regrettent à raison que les philosophes aient souvent une culture scientifique trop courte, mais l’inverse est sans doute plus fréquent et plus regrettable encore. Le philosophe peut, en effet, se passer des savoirs scientifiques pour développer sa propre pensée, alors que l’inverse n’est pas vrai

Je serais plus sévère que vous.

Les «savoirs scientifiques» n'ont de fondement que dans l'être mobile, s'il est.

Or, c'est précisément la question que soulève Aristote, en s'opposant à Parménide et à Héraclite : y a-t-il un être mobile qui soit bien être ?

Cordialement

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Delaporte 
Date:   12-03-2018 17:52

Cher Stagire,

Je partage votre analyse.

La question fondamentale de la Physique est bien : "Existe-t-il un être qui soit à la fois être et non-être, stable et meuble ? Si oui, quel est-il ?" Y a-t-il une tierce voie entre Parménide et Héraclite ? La possibilité d'une science de la nature dépend d'une réponse positive à ces questions. Platon était persuadé qu'il n'y avait pas de science possible d'un être (?) perpétuellement changeant, c'est pourquoi il s'est rabattu sur les Idées.

Cordialement

L'animateur

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   12-03-2018 21:30

Pardon, mais mon Francaise et tres mauvais, donc j'ecrit en Anglaise.

First of all, I am delighted my research has made some impression somewhere, even though there is clearly some uncertainty in your minds about its worth.

First, Stagire is quite right to point out that my critique of the “Aristotelian” view doesn’t take into account the details of what Aristotle says in Physics 3, 3 (what Aristotle says there looks more like the view I am moving towards). But you must consider that I am not really discussing Aristotle's original view. I am addressing the philosophical tradition often enough described as “Aristotelian” (some call it the ‘strict doctrine of causality’ or the ‘production view’ or simply ‘causal realism’), because it is meant to be close enough to Aristotle’s original view. But, it is a tradition in continuous change. So already in 1656 we can see in Hobbes a neo-Aristotelian view that rejects final causes (except in so far as he allows intentions to sometime accompany bodily actions, and then 'final causes' are a sub-class of efficient causes). So maybe one can say that the view I am criticising is an old neo-Aristotelianism (and not Aristotle's views), but it is this old neo-Aristotelian view that is the inspiration of current neo-Aristotelian trend in contemporary metaphysics, and not really Aristotle's original view (Anna Marmodoro may be one of the few who goes all the way back to Aristotle). I don't do justice to these historical qualifications in this project description, but it will be made clearer in the book that I am writing. To some extent it is clearer in ‘Causal Production as Interaction’ from 2002, and which is available here: https://www.academia.edu/343533/Causal_Production_as_Interaction.

I think also that some of the notes to the french translation provided by Delaporte bears the mark of coming from an Aristotle scholar reading me as if I was discussing Aristotle himself, but again, I am not. In fact, most of the comments are ones I can perfectly agree too. They are really pointing out what is wrong with the neo-Aristotelian view I am discussing, from the perspective of Aristotle's original view.

There is one point I don't agree with, and that is the argument that the reaction must be ever so slightly weaker than the action. There is no place to argue this in full here, but if you were right, our physics would be wrong; it would constitute a violation of the conservation laws of physics. The fact that the ripples in water from a stone gradually die out is perfectly compatible with the perfect reciprocity of interactions.

All the best, Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Delaporte 
Date:   13-03-2018 10:23

Dear RD Ingthorsson,

Two points are to be clarified:

-1 ° First of all, this web site (http://www.thomas-d-aquin.com) is not attached to Aristotle (and first to Saint Thomas) for the sake of Aristotle, but for the sake of the truth. This is exactly what Aristotle himself said of his master and friend Plato: "I love Plato and the truth, but the truth more!" It is also the frontispiece of this website: "The purpose of philosophy is not to know what men have thought, but what is the truth of things" (Saint Thomas Aquinas in his Commentary on the Treatise of Heaven of Aristotle).

There may be different imperfect approaches to truth; an imperfect philosophical approach or an imperfect scientific approach, but there is objectively only one philosophico-scientific truth. The differences in conclusions between philosophy and science are related to their own imperfection and not to a difference of nature. In other words, there is not a scientific truth and a philosophical truth that could be legitimately different or even contradictory.

If we are attached to Aristotle and Saint Thomas, it is that to this day they represent for us the most perfect (but obviously still perfectible) approach to the search for truth from a philosophical point of view, for which, factual errors here or there, (like geocentrism, etc.) are not nullifying but explicable.

-2 ° It should be said: Action (singular) = Reactions (plural) (not action = reaction). When the ball 1 strikes the ball 2, the reactions in return are numerous or even infinite (they must actually be infinite if the equality is strict, each reaction generating in turn one or more reactions strictly equal, and thus to infinity).

First, the ball 2 reacts by moving, but also by braking or stopping the ball 1; then the shock necessarily also has a reaction impact on the part of the billiard table; there is also a phenomenon of heating during the friction between the two balls; but also a resonance in the atmosphere, on the Moon and most certainly in the Constellation of the Dog, etc. etc, because of the whole solidarity of the Universe. Perhaps, the "Action = reaction" principle is currently intangible in physics, but no one has ever verified, and will probably never verify it experimentally. No one can say whether this is an absolute and eternal truth or a useful approximation in the current state of our knowledge, as often in the physical sciences.

Kind regards

(Many thanks to Mr Google for translation!)

Cher RD Ingthorsson,

Deux points sont à préciser :

-1° Tout d’abord, ce site web (http://www.thomas-d-aquin.com) n’est pas attaché à Aristote (et d’abord à saint Thomas) pour l’amour d’Aristote, mais pour l’amour de la vérité. C’est exactement ce qu’Aristote disait lui-même de son maître et ami Platon : « j’aime Platon et la vérité, mais plus la vérité ! ». C’est aussi le frontispice de ce site web : « Le but de la philosophie n'est pas de savoir ce que les hommes ont pensé, mais bien quelle est la vérité des choses » (Saint Thomas d’Aquin dans son Commentaire du Traité du Ciel d’Aristote).

Il peut exister différentes approches imparfaites de la vérité ; un approche philosophique imparfaite ou une approche scientifique imparfaite, mais il n’existe objectivement qu’une seule et même vérité philosophico-scientifique. Les différences de conclusions entre philosophie et science tiennent à leur propre imperfection et non à une différence de nature. Autrement dit, il n’existe pas une vérité scientifique et une vérité philosophique qui pourraient être légitimement différentes, voire même contradictoires.

Si nous sommes attachés à Aristote et saint Thomas, c’est qu’à ce jour, ils représentent à nos yeux la démarche la plus parfaite (mais évidemment encore perfectible) de recherche de la vérité d’un point de vue philosophique, pour lequel, les erreurs factuelles çà ou là, (géocentrisme, etc.) ne sont pas dirimantes mais explicables.

-2° Il faudrait dire : Action (au singulier) = Réactions (au pluriel) (et non pas Action = Réaction). Lorsque la boule 1 vient heurter la boule 2, les réactions en retour sont nombreuses, voire infinies (elles doivent d’ailleurs être infinies si l’égalité est stricte, chaque réaction engendrant à son tour une ou des réactions strictement égales, et ainsi à l’infini).

Tout d’abord, la boule 2 réagit en se déplaçant, mais aussi en freinant ou arrêtant la boule 1 ; ensuite, le choc a nécessairement aussi un impact de réaction de la part de la table de billard ; s’ajoute aussi un phénomène d’échauffement lors de la friction entre les deux boules ; mais aussi une résonnance dans l’atmosphère, sur la Lune et très certainement dans la Constellation du Chien, etc. etc, en raison de la solidarité d’ensemble de l’Univers. Peut-être, le principe “Action=Réaction” est-il actuellement intangible en physique, mais personne n’a jamais, ni ne pourra sans doute jamais, le vérifier expérimentalement. Personne ne peut dire s’il s’agit là d’une vérité absolue et éternelle ou d’une approximation utile dans l’état actuel de nos connaissances, comme souvent en sciences physiques.

Cordialement

L'animateur

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   13-03-2018 11:24

Dear Delaporte

I agree to the search for truth, and I think also that Aristotle is closer to truth than most. However, one of the things he had no way of knowing has to do with the reciprocity of interactions. So, if we forget Aristotle for a moment, then in your latest response it seems to me that you interpret the action vs reaction distinction as one roughly mapping onto action vs effects, arguing that a single interaction elicits many effects in whatever is acted on. Well, this is true, but it is also true that the object acted upon will at the same time (and not as a response to the object initially talked about as 'acting') act on the first objects. Action and reaction as I am using it, does not map onto action and effect, but on the mutual influences being exerted in opposite directions between two portions of matter. So this relates to the third law of motion, which is one of the best corroborated laws of physics, and which has not been falsified by quantum physics. It is still regarded as true that whatever acts is in return acted upon, which means really no action has any priority over any other oppositely directed action, and finally means that we really don't have any actions by individual objects only interactions. Here we must cleanly separate intentional action from interactions in the realm of inanimate objects. In fact it may be more appropriate as someone in this thread pointed out earlier to say that nothing in the realm of inanimate objects ever 'acts', they merely react to the intrusion of each other, but even in that case they do exert an influence on each other and suffer a change (many as you point out). In Causal Production as Interaction there is a detailed discussion of the way I am using "Action and Reaction", why it is the correct interpretation drawn from science, and how it is different from the way it is often understood by philosophers and laymen. Cordialement, Valdi

Et voila, Monsieur Google translate:

Je suis d'accord avec la recherche de la vérité, et je pense aussi qu'Aristote est plus proche de la vérité que la plupart. Cependant, l'une des choses qu'il n'avait aucun moyen de savoir a à voir avec la réciprocité des interactions. Donc, si nous oublions Aristote pendant un moment, dans votre dernière réponse, il me semble que vous interprétez la distinction action contre réaction comme une approximation de l'action contre les effets, arguant qu'une seule interaction produit de nombreux effets dans tout ce qui est agi. Eh bien, c'est vrai, mais il est vrai aussi que l'objet sur lequel agit en même temps (et non en réponse à l'objet dont on a d'abord parlé comme «agissant») agit sur les premiers objets. L'action et la réaction, quand je l'utilise, ne se rapportent pas à l'action et à l'effet, mais aux influences mutuelles s'exerçant dans des directions opposées entre deux parties de la matière. Cela concerne donc la troisième loi du mouvement, qui est l'une des lois les mieux corroborées de la physique, et qui n'a pas été falsifiée par la physique quantique. Il est toujours considéré comme vrai que tout ce qui agit en retour agit, ce qui signifie qu'aucune action n'a de priorité sur toute autre action dirigée de façon opposée, et signifie finalement que nous n'avons vraiment aucune action par des objets individuels seulement des interactions. Ici, nous devons séparer proprement l'action intentionnelle des interactions dans le domaine des objets inanimés. En fait, il peut être plus approprié, comme quelqu'un l'a souligné précédemment, de dire que rien dans le domaine des objets inanimés n'agit jamais, ils réagissent simplement à l'intrusion de l'un l'autre, mais même dans ce cas ils exercent une influence l'un sur l'autre et subir un changement (plusieurs comme vous le faites remarquer). Dans Causal Production as Interaction, il y a une discussion détaillée de la façon dont j'utilise «Action and Reaction», pourquoi c'est l'interprétation correcte tirée de la science, et comment elle est différente de la façon dont elle est souvent comprise par les philosophes et les laïcs. Cordialement, Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Delaporte 
Date:   13-03-2018 14:27

Dear Dr Ingthorsson,

Let us recall the three laws of Newton's movement:

-1 ° Any body persevere in the state of rest or uniform movement in a straight line in which it is located, unless some force acts on it, and compels it to change state.

-2 ° The changes that occur in the movement are proportional to the driving force; and are done in the straight line in which this force was printed.

-3 ° Any body A exerting force on a body B undergoes a force of equal intensity, of the same direction but on the opposite, exercised by body B.

It is a fact that NOTHING in nature really fits these laws! For they are formulated in the context of an empty, neutral, immobile, and Infinite Universe (cartesian coordinate system) that does not exist in the reality of things.

Objectively, it is almost impossible for a natural movement to be a straight line from an absolute point of view (seen from the top of the universe pole). A movement can be said to be "rectilinear" only from a relative point of view, (very) limited in time and space, and for a defined observer (evolving in the same cartesian coordinate system). From an absolute point of view, any body launched in local moving in space is always curved, and always ends up achieving a stable state of embedded circular motion.

Moreover, the notion of "force" is at least obscure. Are these contextual active powers as the "gravitational force", themselves effects of previous active powers, and so to the infinite unless the presence of a first motor? No doubt, but to assume that a movement can occur free from the influence of these, as Newton does, is absolutely unrealistic. Without the contextual influence of the fundamental active powers of the universe, it is most possible that any movement would be impossible. So it is not possible to isolate, as Newton does, a simple movement of the forces that interfere with it, as if this simple movement was in some way the internal property of the object (an intrinsic "force") while the other influences would be external to it, Which is a very questionable understanding of the movement of things.

That is why the law of inertia has no other reality than that of a useful approximation. This kind of approximation had a famous predecessor: the "plane geometry" (It is an oxymoron!) of Euclid. The very idea of measuring the terrestrial sphere (what geo-metry means) from straight lines and plane surfaces is "by principle" not the reality of things, but only a useful approximation in limited circumstances, which showed its impotence for the elaboration of "planispheres", for example. It is the same with Newton's laws, which, as far as I know, are seriously harmed by the current state of science, not in terms of equations, but in terms of worldview.

The same applies to Newton's third principle. It presupposes that an interaction can occur between a body A and a body B without any contextual influence, i.e. in an empty, neutral, immobile, and infinite context. But in such a context, in fact, any movement is absolutely impossible in the reality of things. If actually the "force" exercised by A resulted in a "force" of equal intensity and opposite meaning in B, then or any other action of A either on the pool table at the time of impact, either by creating heat or by influencing the atmosphere and the contextual universe, would be void, or the sum of the "forces" of equal intensity in the opposite direction would be greater than the "force" exercised by A.

We get to this difficulty because Newton's “motion”, “context”, and “force” definitions are too coarse compared to reality, as is the plane geometry for Earth measurement. Today, science itself allows us to challenge this vision of the newtonian universe (by strangely approaching the Aristotelian vision on many subjects). Maybe it is time to reformulate fundamental laws of movement that will be more consistent with what we know?

Kind regards


Cher RD Ingthorsson,

Rappelons les trois lois du mouvement de Newton :

-1° Tout corps persévère dans l'état de repos ou de mouvement uniforme en ligne droite dans lequel il se trouve, à moins que quelque force n'agisse sur lui, et ne le contraigne à changer d'état.

-2° Les changements qui arrivent dans le mouvement sont proportionnels à la force motrice ; et se font dans la ligne droite dans laquelle cette force a été imprimée.

-3° Tout corps A exerçant une force sur un corps B subit une force d'intensité égale, de même direction mais de sens opposé, exercée par le corps B.

Il est un fait que RIEN dans la nature ne correspond concrètement à ces lois ! Car elles sont formulées dans le cadre d’un Univers vide, neutre, immlobile, et infini, (repère cartésien) qui n’existe pas dans la réalité des choses.

Objectivement, il est quasi-impossible qu’un mouvement naturel de déplacement soit rectiligne d’un point de vue absolu (vu du haut du pôle de l’Univers). Un mouvement ne peut être dit “rectiligne” que d’un point de vue relatif, (très) limité dans le temps et dans l’espace, et pour un observateur défini (évoluant dans le même repère cartésien). D’un point de vue absolu, tout corps lancé en mouvement de déplacement dans l’espace est toujours courbe, et finit TOUJOURS par parvenir à un état stable de mouvement circulaire embarqué.

Par ailleurs, la notion de “force” est pour le moins obscure. S’agit-il de puissances actives contextuelles comme la “force de gravitation”, elles-mêmes effets de puissances actives antérieures, et ainsi à l’infini à moins de la présence d’un moteur premier ? Sans doute, mais faire l’hypothèse qu’un mouvement puisse se produire exempt de l’influence de ces dernières, comme le fait Newton, n’est absolument pas réaliste. Sans l’influence contextuelle des puissances actives fondamentales de l’Univers, il est fort probable que tout mouvement serait impossible. On ne peut donc isoler comme le fait Newton, un mouvement simple des forces qui interfèrent avec lui, comme si ce mouvement simple était en quelque sorte la propriété interne de l’objet (une “force” intrinsèque ?) alors que les autres influences lui seraient externes, ce qui est une compréhension très discutable du mouvement des choses.

C’est pourquoi la loi d’inertie n’a d’autre réalité que celle d’une approximation utile. Ce genre d’approximation eut un ancêtre célèbre : la “géométrie plane” (c’est un oxymore !) d’Euclide. L’idée même de mesurer la sphère terrestre (ce que signifie géo-métrie) à partir de lignes droites et de surfaces planes est “par principe” non pas la réalité des choses, mais seulement une approximation utile dans des circonstances limitées, qui a montré son impuissance pour l’élaboration de “planisphères”, par exemple. Il en va de même des lois de Newton qui, autant que je sache, sont sérieusement mises à mal par l’état actuel de la science, non pas en termes d’équations, mais en termes de vision du monde.

Il en va de même du troisième principe de Newton. Il présuppose qu’il puisse se produire une interaction entre un corps A et un corps B sans aucune influence contextuelle, c’est-à-dire dans un contexte vide, neutre, immobile, et infini. Mais dans un tel contexte, en fait, tout mouvement est absolument impossible dans la réalité des choses. Si réellement la “force” exercée par A engendrait une “force” d’intensité égale et de sens contraire en B, alors ou bien toute autre action de A soit sur la table de billard au moment de l’impact, soit par création de chaleur, soit par influence sur l’atmosphère et l’univers ambiant, serait nulle, ou bien la somme des “forces” d’intensité égale en sens opposé serait supérieure à la “force” exercée par A.

Nous parvenons à cette difficulté parce que les conceptions de mouvement, de contexte et de force de Newton sont par trop grossières par rapport à la réalité, comme l’est la géométrie plane pour la mesure de la Terre. Aujourd’hui, la science elle-même nous permet de remettre en cause cette vision de l’Univers newtonien (en se rapprochant d’ailleurs étrangement de la vision aristotélicienne sur nombre de sujets). Sans doute est-il temps de reformuler des lois fondamentales du mouvement qui soient davantage en cohérence avec ce que nous savons ?

Cordialement

L'animateur

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Stagire 
Date:   13-03-2018 21:56

Dear RD Ingthorsson,

You wrote :
> First of all, I am delighted my research has made some
> impression somewhere, even though there is clearly some
> uncertainty in your minds about its worth.

There is no doubt in my mind that your «research» is of great value.

You add :
> First, Stagire is quite right to point out that my critique of
> the “Aristotelian” view doesn’t take into account the details
> of what Aristotle says in Physics 3, 3 (what Aristotle says
> there looks more like the view I am moving towards). But you
> must consider that I am not really discussing Aristotle's
> original view.

As you rightly pointed out, the « Aristotle’s original view» is about being as mobile, and yours is about another subject matter, namely :
> I am addressing the philosophical tradition
> often enough described as “Aristotelian”…

You precised :
> However, one of the things he [Aristotle] had no way
> of knowing has to do with the reciprocity
> of interactions.

In my message, I wrote :
> In short, the author of the article did not understand the doctrine of
> Aristotle on the mobile being.
I must correct it as followed : « In short, the author of the article does not fully disclose that the doctrine of Aristotle is about the mobile being as such

About «reciprocity of interactions», Mr Delaporte recalled «the three laws of Newton's movement».

The first is :
> -1 ° Any body persevere in the state of rest or uniform
> movement in a straight line in which it is located, unless some
> force acts on it, and compels it to change state.

The subject of the movement here is named «body». Is it a being ? If yes, how does it become a being, il it becomes ; if it does not, it is eternal ? An answer to those two questions is not provided by the Newton’s law; more exactly, the Newton’s law takes for granted an answer to those two questions. And this is perfectly correct. Why? Because the issue raised by the two questions is a philosophical matter.

The third is :
> -3 ° Any body A exerting force on a body B undergoes a force of
> equal intensity, of the same direction but on the opposite,
> exercised by body B.

You wrote :
> Action and reaction as I am using it,
> does not map onto action and effect,
> but on the mutual influences being exerted in opposite
> directions between two portions of matter.

That comment is perfectly correct. The important point is : «does not map onto action and effect».

But, in Physics 3, 3 , Aristotle raises precisely the question about the encounter between cause and its proper effect.

Action and reaction as you are using would not be possible without an answer given to the foregoing question.

As a matter of principle, Aristotle’s teaching cannot directly solve issues raised by Newton who investigates the measurement problem labelled in the second law.

Best regards

Stagire

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   20-03-2018 01:34

Dear Stagire and Delaporte
Just to let you know my silence is only because of other commitments elsewhere (have just pushed the button to send of a grant application for "Neo-Aristotelian Presentism"), I'll respond to your comments shortly. Both raise very interesting questions. All the best, Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   27-04-2018 15:54

Dear Mr Ingthorsson

We must be mindful of Aristotle's four cause analysis. But, in my opinion, Aristotle did not understand that the driving principle of the physical world can only act in an immanent and interrelated way, according to the determination of elements.

For Aristotle, the driving principle of the physical world acts through a prime mobile, which is supposed to set in motion all the other bodies. But this vision corresponds to a mechanical vision of the world, in the sense that this prime mobile could only move the other bodies by acting on them through contact. I call it mechanical action between two bodies, an action by contact, or thanks to a quantified medium acting via a contact. On the contrary, a non-mechanical action would be a remote action that does not require a quantified medium. If such an action is necessary to understand the organisation of the physical world, it compels to pose another principle other than the only quantified matter. In my opinion and for various reasons, this other principle can only act in an immanent and interrelated way, according to the determination of elements. This would be the only way to fully respect the causal approach, having a worldview that is compatible with the various phenomena that can be observed. And it is from here that one could formulate a conceptual assumption that allows the conceptual unity of physics. This conclusion deserves to be explored in a very thorough way through philosophy and physics, because it seems inevitable to me in the long run. We had a long discussion with Mr. Delaporte about this question, but as for now, he maintains Aristotle's vision with regards to the driving principle of the mode of action. I wrote four books about this subject, the first in 1990, I will give you some references by mail.

I do not speak English well, this text was translated by EasyTranslate.

Kind regards,
Philippe de Bellescize


Cher Monsieur Ingthorsson

Il faut garder l'analyse par les quatre causes d'Aristote. Mais Aristote n'a, à mon avis, pas compris que le principe moteur du monde physique ne peut agir que de manière immanente et par interrelation, selon la détermination des éléments.

Pour Aristote, le principe moteur du monde physique agit à travers un premier mobile, qui est censé mettre en mouvement tous les autres corps. Mais cette vision correspond à une vision mécanique du monde, dans le sens que ce premier mobile ne pourrait, mettre les autres corps en mouvement, qu’en agissant par contact. J’appelle action mécanique entre deux corps une action par contact, ou grâce à un médium quantifié agissant par contact. Une action non mécanique serait donc, à l’opposé, une action à distance ne nécessitant pas de médium quantifié. Si une telle action est nécessaire pour comprendre l’organisation du monde physique, elle oblige de poser un autre principe que la seule matière quantifiée. Cet autre principe ne pouvant agir, selon moi et pour diverses raisons, que de manière immanente et par interrelation, selon la détermination des éléments. Cela serait la seule manière de respecter pleinement l’approche causale, en ayant une vision du monde compatible avec les divers phénomènes pouvant être constatés. Et c’est à partir de là que l’on pourrait formuler un postulat conceptuel permettant l’unité conceptuelle de la physique. Cette conclusion mériterait d’être creusée de manière très approfondie par la philosophie et par la physique, car elle me paraît incontournable à terme. Nous avons longuement échangé avec monsieur Delaporte sur cette question, mais pour l'instant il en reste à la vision d'Aristote en ce qui concerne le mode d'action du principe moteur. J'ai écrit quatre livres sur ce sujet, le premier en 1990, je vais vous donner quelques références par mail.

Je ne parle pas bien l'anglais, ce texte a été traduit par EasyTranslate.

Bien cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   04-05-2018 10:48

Hello,

First of all, thanks to this discussion and translation of Mr. Guy Delaporte, I must say that I am pleased to have read Mr. Ingthorsson’s analysis. He focuses on a particularly interesting issue. And, it may be important to progress on this matter in the Aristotelian thinking, so that the causal analysis can take its rightful place in the scientific world. But first, science must be able to make most of the world's vision compatible with its progress.

In my opinion, the many points of disagreement between Mr. Ingthorsson’s analysis and that of Mr. Delaporte’s can be solved if one places himself within the framework of a relational approach of space and motion. I will not go into detail with the different points although that is possible. There is some idea about the initial principles of understanding, and there is some thought to be given in the "how" approach, as the coming into fruition of causes may be indicative of the nature of reality. If we solely cling onto the knowledge of principles, without looking enough on the way how things are made to be ("the how"), we might make analytical errors, while seemingly perfect in obeying the initial principles of comprehension and logic. Likewise, a knowledge of "how" without respecting the fundamental principles can turn short. But the two points of view are likely to enrich each other provided that they do not conclude too quickly. For example, if we have a driving principle that acts immanently and in an interrelated way, we see that the active power is present in the passive power, and yet it is not the same thing as to be in power or to be in act.


I agree with Mr. Ingthorsson with regards to presentism, and I think of Mr. Delaporte. And, in my opinion, when physicists have understood that it is necessary to leave the concept of time associated with the restricted relativity of "eternalism", this will provoke a major conceptual disruption. Indeed, this will lead physics to an important paradigm shift in its representation of space-time and motion. I gave various elements in my last book "And if Einstein was mistaken on a crucial point in his analysis leading to the restricted relativity" and in the circular letter of 14/02/2018 (have a look at my website). I hope that philosophers and scientists will resume this demonstration in a more perfect way than I have been able to, so that physics may quickly move forward on this issue. In fact we are certain with our conclusion on this subject, and this should be treated in a purely logical and mathematical way. It is enough to look at which principle is implied by the invariance of the speed of light. The principle of simultaneous relativity at the physical level is implicitly laid down with the second assumption of restricted relativity: the invariance of the speed of light (see end of section A of the circular letter); and, it is because scientists have not fully clarified this question yet, they haven't seen that we're being led to contradictions.

With this paradigm shift, we should find an Aristotelian concept of causality and time (1). The causality approach in physics is sometimes limited to the relationship between the past and the result. But causality does not end in itself, causality is what is fundamental, the existence of beings, the structure and the behaviour of such. In fact, for there to be a relation between the past and the result, a reality must react through this or that way. And this is not fully taken into account with the causality approach of restricted and general relativity. Indeed, considering space-time diagrams, and taking into account the existence of bodies, we arrive at contradictions. From the moment we have understood that there really is a present time in the universe, we also understand that there is an adaptation of the speed of light in the spatial configuration, which leads the physical to a relational approach of space and motion.

It seems to me, that the argument developed by Mr. Ingthorsson in his quoted article, should be able to take its place in a relational approach of the physical world. In a relational approach of space and motion, it is the actual relation between the bodies which causes the movement. I am not sure; however, that the proponents of loop gravitation, such that of Carlo Rovelli, take into account this aspect of things. This makes it possible in finding the concept of a current cause for any motion which is present in Aristotle's. But since the relation between the bodies cannot be mechanical in all cases (see my previous message), this requires a driving principle, distinct from the quantified matter, acting in an immanent and interrelated manner. The only one who can replace this driving principle is God who is at the heart of physics. The role of the driving principle is one of the aspects to be taken into account in the formulation of a conceptual assumption on which the conceptual unity of physics could be based.


We have arrived at a period when philosophy and physics should be able to come together in a practical way, but for that, philosophy must discover valuable principles not only from the point of view of being and of pure meaning but also of efficiency, physics being the discovery of coherence in the structure and movement of the physical world, in a knowledge of quantitative proportions, and according to a certain mathematical formalism. The question is to see if we can, with regards to a certain vision of the physical world and its future, lay down a conceptual assumption that takes into account an Aristotelian causal approach. In physics, we find certain theories of the different levels of intelligibility, worldview, mathematical formalism and functional aspect. There is a systematic aspect between the various first concepts and the axiomatic, sometimes semantic type (what does this concept mean in relation to other concepts): mathematical (what does this concept mean mathematically), or physics (what does this concept mean physically), refer to Mario Bunge's book "A Philosophy of Physics". The idea of a conceptual assumption is to be able to relate in a system, starting from a conceptual assumption, the initial concepts of physics amongst each other; hence to have a possible link between the outcomes of a realistic philosophy and general theory of the universe. Both philosophy and physics can reach the formulation of this conceptual assumption (2).

In philosophy, there are undoubtedly several ways to discover the driving principle's course of action. There is no doubt that the simplest way is to demonstrate that on one hand any motion implies an actual cause, and on the other hand, this actual cause cannot be mechanical in all cases. We can refer for example to Mr. Delaporte's sample commenting on the text of Mr. Ingthorsson, I quote:

"With Aristotle's idea, the main cause is immediate (without a conduit) and simultaneous (at the same time) with its very own effect. Contrary to what our author says, there is no time difference between cause and effect. This touches upon a delicate question. When billiard ball 1 is moved and comes into contact with billiard ball 2, at the point of impact, 1 is the only one that causes the action to 2 at this point: it no longer causes any action once ball 2 has broken the contact with ball 1 and continues its path, since 2 is precisely no longer in contact with 1 and 1 therefore has no power over 2 (there is no known case of telepathy or telekinesis between the billiard balls!). But then, what is the cause of ball 2's path once it's separated from 1?"

Now, digging into this example, in my opinion, it may be possible to pose the requirement to a given point of non-mechanical cause. That which lays down a non-material physical cause, and thus gradually arriving at the idea of a driving principle acting in an immanent and interrelated way, according to the determination of elements. Indeed, in this tackled case, if we need a non-mechanical cause, and if the driving principle responsible for this non-mechanical cause did not act in an immanent and interrelated way, it would no longer be a question of physical action from every point of view; because it is the spiritual principle that acts directly on the ball regardless of its relation to other bodies and its environment. In this case we find ourselves with Aristotle's idea of prime mobile. The action in which the primary motor is supposed to have an effect on the prime mobile, this is not a physical action in every aspect. If I have to reiterate, perhaps with a little too much insistence, on this driving principle's idea on the course of action of the physical world, it is because it is capable of clarifying everything. Indeed, in my opinion, it is from here that we can lay down a conceptual assumption to reach a conceptual unity of physics.

It is also important to understand that the discovery of the driving principle's course of action of the physical world brings an enormous amount of things to causal analysis. Without denying the principle role of non-contradiction, by logic this leads to the idea of a hidden third (refer this subject to a physicist like Basarab Nicolescu). Indeed, if the driving principle acts immanently and by interrelation, we have a hidden third, the driving principle beyond that of A and B. I absolutely do not deny the principle role of non-contradiction, but the truth is never entirely contained in our different formulations. It is also about manifesting the hidden third. Logic is a sensible tool to perfect our reasoning, and with this I can take advantage of the skills I lack in this field, but logic alone is unable to allow us to discover the truth. Most of the time, even if what is meant for is imperfectly represented, it does not detract from its truth.

But I do not want to distract the various participants with respect to the reviews made by Mr. Ingthorsson, because they seem genuine and promising. It shows the proponents of Aristotle's philosophy that one must evolve in their interpretation of things. I must say, that in view of my own approach, I agree with many of his opinions. But the several criticisms are also important, to see how his positioning can reach a more traditional analysis.

Note (1):
A return to Aristotle's concept of time could take place. Aristotle's time is the number of the before and after movements, based on how many times one allows the movement to be counted. But time can itself be numbered by establishing a relation between two movements, which makes it possible to avoid the parameter t (this idea is presented and defended by Carlo Rovelli). On the other hand Carlo Rovelli, who is inspired by Aristotle's idea, if I understand correctly thinks that time is discrete, which to me seems not entirely the prolongation of Aristotle's concept.

It is the same thing to say that during the clock's movement, there was a movement of the body, as to say that, during such movement of the body, there was a movement of the clock (this makes it possible to dispense with parameter t). Since the body's existence is continuous, we cannot deny that the body's movement is continuous, we can no longer deny that time is continuous. While referring to Aristotle, it seems to me that this the reason why Carlo Rovelli does not go with the end of reasoning.

The relation between two movements may vary depending on the spatial conditions, but that is not why there is no present period for the Universe. Two "identical" clocks, placed in different spatial conditions, can very well rotate simultaneously at different rates - for example two "identical" clocks, two different floors of the same building. To say that there is an absolute simultaneity is to say that there is a present period for the universe. From my point of view, the physics’ concept of space and time must be, completely redesigned in this context. And we must return to an Aristotelian perception of causality, the perception of causality, of restricted relativity, limited and distorted. Moving forward, I hope that scientists will eventually react, realising that we must leave the restricted relativity's concept of time, the mistake of restricted relativity being deferred as shown in general relativity (see section C of the circular letter). I do not deny the interest in restricted relativity, but it is conceptually built on sand. Of course it is very important to understand that there is a connection between space and time, but to think of this relation, one cannot be satisfied with restricted relativity and general relativity. If scientists have reached that point, it is also because they have lost sight of the four cause analysis, specific in the Aristotelian philosophy. We cannot be complacent with an Aristotelian vision of the world, but we must avoid throwing out ''the little one'' with ''bathwater''. The subject is important because it enables physics to enter into a new paradigm.

I also note that Lee Smolin, who was with Carlo Rovelli, one of the initiators of Loop Quantum Gravity , understood that it is necessary to leave the restricted relativity's concept of time. And in this case, it is my opinion that we must work. The question is: how can an Aristotelian philosophy and a completely relational concept of space-time come together? I think that a space-time relational concept implies that the driving principle acts in an immanent and interrelated way, according to the determination of elements, just as the discovery of the driving principle's course of action of the physical world which leads to a relational space-time concept. That's how I got there. Carlo Rovelli and Lee Smolin concluded the idea of space quanta in mid-1990s. I recently got this information by reading an article from Figaro. But I exposed a similar idea, having discovered the driving principle's course of action, in September 1990 in my first book. On the other hand, I had not discovered at that time the driving principle's nature, nor was it necessary to leave the restricted relativity's concept of time.

Note (2):
We can resume the theory of topological bootstrap: "Here is a definition ... of bootstrap given by Chew: "The only mechanism that satisfies the general principles of physics is the mechanism of nature ... ; ... The observable particles.. represent the only quantum and relativistic system that can be conceived without internal contradiction ... Each nuclear particle has three different roles: 1) a constituent role of compound sets; 2) a mediating role of force responsible for the cohesion of a compound set, and 3) a role of a compound system...”
In this definition, the portion appears at the same time as the whole. Nature is conceived as a global entity, inseparable at the fundamental level. Basarab Nicolescu ‘’We, the particle and the world’’ page 41-42.

From my perspective, it is the driving principle that is responsible for the force causing cohesion and evolution to the compound set.


Sincerely
Philippe de Bellescize

Translated by Easy Translate

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bonjour,

Tout d'abord, je dois dire que je suis heureux d'avoir, grâce à cette discussion et à la traduction de monsieur Guy Delaporte, pris connaissance de l'analyse de monsieur Ingthorsson. Il porte son attention sur une problématique particulièrement intéressante. Et, cela peut être important d'avancer sur ce sujet, pour que l'analyse causale, au sens aristotélicien, puisse tenir la place qui devrait lui revenir dans le monde scientifique. Mais il faut, au préalable, que la science puisse profiter d'une vision du monde compatible avec ses avancées.

A mon avis beaucoup de points de désaccord, entre l'analyse de monsieur Ingthorsson et celle de monsieur Delaporte, peuvent se résoudre si on se place dans le cadre d'une approche relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement. Je ne vais pas détailler les différents points bien que cela soit possible. Il y a une réflexion à mener en ce qui concerne les principes initiaux de compréhension, et il y a une réflexion à mener en ce qui concerne l'approche du "comment", l'exercice des causes pouvant être révélatrice de la nature de la réalité. Si on en reste seulement à une connaissance des principes, sans suffisamment regarder la manière dont les choses se réalisent ("le comment"), on peut faire des erreurs d'analyse, tout en semblant parfaitement respecter les principes initiaux de compréhension et la logique. De même une connaissance "du comment" sans respecter les principes fondamentaux peut tourner court. Mais les deux points de vue sont susceptibles de s'enrichir mutuellement à condition de ne pas conclure trop rapidement. Par exemple, si on a un principe moteur qui agit de manière immanente et par interrelation, on voit bien que la puissance active est présente dans la puissance passive, et pourtant ce n'est pas la même chose d'être en puissance ou d'être en acte.



Je rejoins monsieur Ingthorsson en ce qui concerne le présentisme, c'est aussi le cas je pense de monsieur Delaporte. Et, à mon avis, quand les physiciens auront compris qu'il faut sortir de la conception du temps associée à la relativité restreinte "l'éternalisme", cela va provoquer un bouleversement conceptuel majeur. En effet cela va conduire la physique à un changement de paradigme important en ce qui concerne sa représentation de l'espace-temps et du mouvement. J'ai donné les divers éléments dans mon dernier livre "Et si Einstein s'était trompé sur un point capital dans son analyse aboutissant à la relativité restreinte" et dans la lettre circulaire du 14/02/2018 (voir sur mon site). J'espère que des philosophes et des scientifiques vont reprendre cette démonstration d'une manière plus parfaite que je n'ai pu le faire, afin que la physique puisse avancer rapidement sur cette question. En effet on a la possibilité de conclure de manière certaine sur ce sujet, et cela devrait pouvoir être traité de manière purement logique et mathématique. Il suffit de regarder quel principe est impliqué par l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière. Le principe de relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique est implicitement posé avec le deuxième postulat de la relativité restreinte: l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière (voir fin de la section A de la lettre circulaire), et, c'est parce que les scientifiques n'ont pas fait toute la lumière sur cette question, qu'ils n'ont pas vu que l'on aboutissait à des contradictions.

Avec ce changement de paradigme, on devrait retrouver une conception Aristotélicienne de la causalité et du temps (1). L'approche de la causalité en physique est parfois limitée au rapport entre l'antécédent et le conséquent. Or la causalité ce n'est pas seulement cela, la causalité c'est ce qui rend compte, de l'existence des êtres, de la structure et du comportement de ceux ci. En effet, pour qu'il y ait un rapport entre l'antécédent et le conséquent, il faut qu'une réalité se comporte de telle ou telle manière. Et c'est ce qui n'est pas pleinement pris en compte avec la conception de la causalité de la relativité restreinte et générale. En effet, en considérant les diagrammes d'espace-temps, et en prenant en compte l'existence des corps, on arrive à des contradictions. A partir du moment où l'on a compris qu'il y a nécessairement un instant présent pour l'univers, on comprend aussi qu'il y a une adaptation de la vitesse de la lumière à la configuration spatiale, ce qui peut conduire la physique à une conception relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement.

Il me semble, que la problématique développée par Monsieur Ingthorsson dans l'article cité, devrait pouvoir prendre sa place dans une approche relationnelle du monde physique. Dans une conception relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement, c'est la relation actuelle entre les corps qui est cause du mouvement. Je ne suis d'ailleurs pas sûr, que les partisans de la gravitation à boucles, comme Carlo Rovelli, tiennent compte de cet aspect des choses. Cela peut permettre de retrouver la notion, présente chez Aristote, de cause actuelle pour tout mouvement. Mais comme la relation entre les corps ne peut pas être mécanique dans tous les cas de figure (voir mon précédent message), cela oblige à poser un principe moteur, distinct de la matière quantifiée, agissant de manière immanente et par interrelation. Ce qui peut replacer le principe moteur qui est Dieu au cœur de la physique. Le rôle du principe moteur étant un des aspects à prendre en compte dans la formulation d'un postulat conceptuel sur lequel pourrait reposer l'unité conceptuelle de la physique.


Nous sommes arrivés à un moment ou la philosophie et la physique devraient pouvoir se rejoindre de manière pratique, mais, pour cela, il faut que la philosophie découvre des principes ayant une valeur non seulement du point de vue de l'être et de la pure signification mais aussi de l'efficience, la physique étant la découverte de la cohérence dans la structure et le mouvement du monde physique, dans une connaissance des proportions quantitatives, et selon un certain formalisme mathématique. La question est de voir si on peut, en ce qui concerne une certaine vision du monde physique et de son devenir, poser un postulat conceptuel qui tienne compte d'une approche causale de type aristotélicien. On retrouve en physique dans certaines théories différents niveaux d'intelligibilité, la vision du monde, le formalisme mathématique, l'aspect opérationnel. Il y a un aspect systématique entre les divers concepts premiers et l'axiomatique quelle soit de type sémantique (qu'est ce que ce concept signifie par rapport aux autres concepts), mathématique (qu'est ce que ce concept signifie mathématiquement), ou physique (qu'est ce que ce concept signifie physiquement), se reporter au livre "une philosophie de la physique" de Mario Bunge. L'idée d'un postulat conceptuel est de rattacher en système, à partir d'un postulat conceptuel, les concepts initiaux de la physique entre eux, et ainsi d'avoir un lien possible entre les conclusions d'une philosophie réaliste et une théorie générale de l'Univers. La philosophie comme la physique pouvant arriver à la formulation de ce postulat conceptuel (2).

En philosophie il y a sans doute plusieurs voies pour arriver à découvrir le mode d'action du principe moteur. Sans doute que la plus simple est de démontrer d'une part que tout mouvement implique une cause actuelle, et d'autre part que cette cause actuelle ne peut pas être dans tous les cas de figure mécanique. On peut par exemple se référer à l'exemple de monsieur Delaporte commentant le texte de monsieur Ingthorsson, je cite:

"Chez Aristote, la cause propre est immédiate (sans intermédiaire) et simultanée (au même moment) avec son effet propre. Contrairement à ce que dit notre auteur, il n’y a pas d’écart de temps entre la cause et l’effet. Ceci évoque une question délicate. Lorsque la boule de billard 1 est mue et entre en contact avec la boule de billard 2, au moment de l’impact, 1 n’est cause que de ce qui se passe en 2 à cet instant: il n’est plus cause de ce qui se passe une fois que 2 a rompu le contact avec 1 et continue son trajet, puisque précisément2 n’est plus en contact sur 1 et 1 n’a donc plus aucun pouvoir sur 2 (il n’y a pas de cas reconnu de télépathie ni de télékinésie parmi les boules de billard!). Mais alors, qui est cause propre du trajet de 2 une fois séparé de 1?"

Or en creusant cet exemple on peut à mon avis arriver à poser la nécessité à un moment donné d'une cause propre non mécanique. Ce qui oblige à poser une cause physique non matérielle, et ainsi d'arriver progressivement à l'idée d'un principe moteur agissant de manière immanente et par interrelation, selon la détermination des éléments. En effet, dans le cas de figure évoqué, si on a besoin d'une cause non mécanique, et si le principe moteur responsable de cette cause non mécanique n'agissait pas de manière immanente et par interrelation, il ne s'agirait plus d'une action physique à tout point de vue; car il faudrait que le principe spirituel agisse directement sur la boule indépendamment de son rapport aux autres corps et à son environnement. On se trouve d'ailleurs dans ce cas là avec l'idée du premier mobile d'Aristote. L'action, que le premier moteur est censé avoir sur le premier mobile, n'étant pas une action physique à tout point de vue. Si je suis revenu, peut être avec un peu trop d'insistance, sur cette idée du mode d'action du principe moteur du monde physique, c'est parce qu'elle est susceptible d'éclairer tout le reste. En effet, à mon avis, c'est à partir de là que l'on peut poser un postulat conceptuel permettant d'arriver à l'unité conceptuelle de la physique.

Il faut aussi bien comprendre que, la découvert du mode d'action du principe moteur du monde physique, apporte énormément de choses en ce qui concerne l'analyse causale. Et même en logique, sans nier le rôle du principe de non contradiction, cela peut amener à l'idée du tiers caché (se reporter à ce sujet à un physicien comme Basarab Nicolescu). En effet, si le principe moteur agit de manière immanente et par interrelation, on a un tiers caché, au delà de A et de B, le principe moteur. Je ne nie absolument pas le rôle du principe de non contradiction, mais la vérité n'est jamais entièrement contenue dans nos diverses formulations. Il s'agit aussi de manifester le tiers caché. La logique est un outil censé parfaire nos raisonnement, et je peux profiter ici des compétences qui me manque dans ce domaine, mais la logique à elle seule est inapte à nous faire découvrir la vérité. Souvent, même si ce qui est signifié, est signifié de manière imparfaite, cela n'enlève pas sa part de vérité.

Mais je ne veux pas distraire les divers intervenants en ce qui concerne la ligne d'analyse suivie par Monsieur Ingthorsson, car elle me paraît originale et prometteuse. Il indique, aux partisans de la philosophie d'Aristote, qu'il faut évoluer dans leur interprétation des choses. Je dois dire, qu'au vu de ma propre démarche, je rejoins bon nombre de ses avis. Mais les diverses critiques sont aussi importantes, afin de voir comment son positionnement peut rejoindre une analyse plus traditionnelle.

Note (1):
Un retour à la conception du temps d'Aristote pourrait s'opérer. Le temps pour Aristote est le nombre du mouvement selon l'avant et l'après, dans le sens de ce qui permet de nombrer le mouvement. Mais le temps peut être lui-même nombré en établissant un rapport entre deux mouvement, ce qui permet d'éviter le paramètre t (cette idée est présentée et défendue par Carlo Rovelli). Par contre Carlo Rovelli, qui s'inspire de la position d'Aristote, si j'ai bien compris pense que le temps est discret, ce qui ne me paraît pas totalement dans le prolongement de la conception d'Aristote.

C'est la même chose de dire que, pendant tel mouvement de l'horloge, il y a eu tel mouvement du corps, que de dire que, pendant tel mouvement du corps, il y a eu tel mouvement de l'horloge (ce qui permet de se passer du paramètre t). Comme on ne peut pas nier, du fait que l'existence d'un corps est continue, que le mouvement d'un corps est continu, on ne peut pas nier non plus que le temps est continu. C'est pour cela que Carlo Rovelli, tout en se référant à Aristote, ne va, me semble t-il, pas au bout du raisonnement.

Le rapport entre deux mouvement peut varier en fonction des conditions spatiales, mais ce n'est pas pour cela qu'il n'y a pas un instant présent pour l'Univers, deux horloges "identiques", placées dans des conditions spatiales différentes, pouvant très bien tourner simultanément à des rythmes différents - par exemple deux horloges "identiques" à deux étages différents d'un même immeuble. Dire qu'il y a une simultanéité absolue, revient à dire qu'il y a un instant présent pour l'univers. La conception de l'espace-temps de la physique doit être, de mon point de vue, totalement repensée dans ce cadre. Et il faut revenir à une perception aristotélicienne de la causalité, la perception de la causalité, de la relativité restreinte, étant limitée et faussée. On avance, j'espère que les scientifiques vont finir par réagir, en se rendant compte qu'il faut sortir de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte, l'erreur de la relativité restreinte étant d'ailleurs en partie reportée dans la relativité générale (voir section C de la lettre circulaire). Je ne nie pas l'intérêt de la relativité restreinte, mais, conceptuellement elle est bâtie sur du sable. Certes il était très important de comprendre qu'il y a un rapport entre espace et temps, mais on ne peut pas se satisfaire, de la relativité restreinte et de la relativité générale, pour penser ce rapport. Si les scientifiques en sont arrivés là c'est aussi parce qu'ils ont perdu de vue l'analyse par les quatre causes, propre à la philosophie Aristotélicienne. On ne peut certes pas en rester à la vision du monde d'Aristote, mais il faut éviter de jeter "le petit" avec "l'eau du bain". Le sujet est important, car il s'agit pour la physique d'entrer dans un nouveau paradigme.

Je signale aussi que Lee Smolin, qui est avec Carlo Rovelli un des initiateurs de la gravitation quantique à boucles, à compris qu'il faut sortir de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte. Et c'est à mon avis dans cette direction qu'il faut travailler. La question étant: comment la philosophie aristotélicienne et une conception complètement relationnelle de l'espace-temps peuvent elles se rejoindre? Je pense qu'une conception relationnelle de l'espace-temps implique que le principe moteur agisse de manière immanente et par interrelation, selon la détermination des éléments, de même la découverte du mode d'action du principe moteur du monde physique va conduire à une conception relationnelle de l'espace-temps. C'est d'ailleurs comme cela que j'y suis arrivé. Carlo Rovelli et Lee Smolin sont arrivés à l'idée de quanta d'espace au milieu des années 1990. J'ai eu cette information dernièrement en lisant un article du figaro. Or j'ai exposé une idée similaire, en ayant découvert le mode d'action du principe moteur, en septembre 1990 dans mon premier livre. Par contre à cette époque je n'avais pas découvert la nature du principe moteur, ni qu'il fallait sortir de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte.

Note (2):
On peut reprendre la théorie du bootstrap topologique : « Voici une définition … du bootstrap donnée par Chew : « Le seul mécanisme qui satisfait aux principes généraux de la physique est le mécanisme de la nature … ; … Les particules observées.. représentent le seul système quantique et relativiste qui peut être conçu sans contradiction interne … Chaque particule nucléaire a trois rôles différents : 1) un rôle de constituant des ensembles composés ; 2) un rôle de médiateur de la force responsable de la cohésion de l’ensemble composé, et 3) un rôle de système composé… »
Dans cette définition, la partie apparaît en même temps que le tout. La nature est conçue comme étant une entité globale, non-séparable au niveau fondamental. » Basarab Nicolescu « Nous, la particule et le monde » page 41-42.

Dans ma perspective, c'est le principe moteur qui est cause de la force responsable de la cohésion et de l'évolution de l'ensemble composé.

Cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (05-05-2018 20:59)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   06-05-2018 16:24

Dear Delaporte.

Sorry for my late response. I have just had a very intensive period of teaching. But here is one reflection on your take on the laws of motion. It relates closely to issues I have been struggling with for some time now. Let me try to state my current view on it. Very briefly, my impression is that your worries are closely aligned with what Nancy Cartwright has argued about laws of nature, and I find in her a friction between her Aristotelian sympathies and her acceptance of an empiricist view of science.

You claim, as she does, that nothing fits the laws of motion. I am not so sure. It all depends if one reads the laws as tools for predicting behaviour, and that they must be confirmed by observing that behaviour being manifested (empiricism), or they are trying to say something about how objects influence one another to change each other’s state of motion (Aristotelian).

Let's assume the classical framework where there is gravitation, and hence everything is always affected by forces and thus never actually moves uniformly in a straight line. Does it follow the 1st law is false, or only holds true for an ‘empty, neutral, immobile, and Infinite Universe’? Only if the law is interpreted simply as a tool for predicting the observation of uniform motion in the absence of influence, and when we require that law to be confirmed by the actual manifestation of uniform motion in the absence of influence. However, we can interpret it instead as a statement about what is required for producing a change in the state of motion, notably the exertion of influence; objects only change their state of motion if something influences them to do so. The second law is then supposed to give us the details of how the magnitude of the force/influence relates to acceleration of the affected object, given its mass. The second law is now known to be false, while it still is believed to hold true that there is no change in the state of motion unless there is an influence.

The third law states that for any influence exerted by one object on another, there is always an oppositely directed influence being exerted by the second object on the first. This law, as far as I know, is also thought to hold good, although it is perhaps often expressed differently, i.e. in terms of symmetry of interactions.

On this reading, Newtonian laws do have to do with the behaviour of real bodies in real space, and the first and third law, are still accepted as true when interpreted broadly as statements about influences of various kind.

But the main question perhaps is why one would want to claim that the laws lie? Well, they ‘lie’ if they are understood as tools for predicting behaviour. But note that they are then going to ‘lie’ even if they are true. Nothing actually moves exactly in accordance to our predictions, because predictions are made on the basis of conceptual models of some given system, and the conceptual model (because of epistemic constraints) can only include known factors. Since our knowledge of the details of any system is always less than perfect, no prediction ever made will correctly describe the behaviour of the system. This is an epistemic constraint that has absolutely nothing to do with the truth of the laws.

Now, you also say the concept of 'force' is obscure, and I would agree that it is indeed a problematic concept. I think it will in the end have to be understood simply as a primitive notion about some magnitude of influence (not to be identified with the power that allows such influence to be exerted). But the standard problem with the concept hails from the empiricist tradition, e.g. in the writing of Mach and Hertz, who both wanted to get rid of it. They wanted to get rid of it because it is an unobservable, in similar ways that empiricism has wanted to get rid of the every theoretical notion that struck them as unobservable, like 'material cause' or 'power'. To my mind the obscurity of the concept has mostly to do with the question of how we operationalise such a primitive notion as 'influence', especially if we accept that influence is only exerted in interactions between two or more objects and therefore always comes in plural (influences) while the outcome is joint effect of the two and therefore never the manifestation of one or other influence, but of them both together. The problem is to distinguish between the contributions of each influence singularly on the basis of the observed outcome.

Kind regards, Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   06-05-2018 18:12

Dear Philippe (if I may)

I think that my answer to Delaporte relates to the first point of your reply, notably that we consider not just knowledge of principles but the "how", notably of how the causes work to bring something to fruition.

When we formulate principles we often do so in extreme abstraction, like "F=ma". Having done that there is a tendency to think that we now, have established something and can move on to other things. We then forget how we arrived at the abstract principle, and with that we forget (or mislay) our understanding of how it works in detail. The principle then tends to become a description of what happens, but the deeper understanding of why it happens like the principle says it does, is no longer in the forefront of our conceptual world.

All the best

Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   11-05-2018 10:31

Dear Valdi Ingthorsson,

Presentism and the Aristotelian approach of causality are linked.

Besides, you have written: "(have just pushed the button to send of a grant application for "Neo-Aristotelian Presentism)"

The subject at hand in my last book "And if Einstein was wrong on a crucial point in his analysis leading to the restricted relativity" and the circular letter of 14/02/2018 could in my opinion be formulated in a purely logical and mathematical way. I hope to find a day of goodwill on this subject, because this isn't my competence. You could deal with this item in your project. The advantage of such a demonstration is that, from there, the scientific world would have to admit the well-foundedness of this position.

This is what I think is necessary to demonstrate from a logical and mathematical point of view:

(A) the invariance of the speed of light; the second assumption of relativity implies simultaneous relativity at the physical level.

Simultaneous relativity at the physical level:

(If you stand in Einstein's train of thought experiment.)

When both observers are at the same distance from both light sources - that is when they are facing each other - the light beam at the rear of the train is supposed to exist vis-à-vis the observer of the station and not vis-à-vis that of the train.

(B) Simultaneous relativity at the physical level leads to contradictions.

Refer to the shuttle and missile trajectory: taking into account the presence of missile according to what is shown on the space-time diagram - which is the strict application of the principle of simultaneous relativity at the physical level - leading to two contradictory calculations with regards to the position of the missile in relation to the shuttle.

See the space-time diagram on this video, the text is read by an actor in English:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZLSlDn4W_8&feature=youtu.be

(C) this means that there is an absolute simultaneity at the physical level, because there is no third possibility. That is the speed of light cannot be in all cases an invariable figure.

The notion of absolute simultaneity leads to presentism: "there is a present moment for the Universe" - because what is "present for an observer" is also "present for another observer".

This subject is not meant to be dealt with in this discussion, but you might want to consider it in your future project. The question on the restricted relativity's concept of time is an important step in the idea of discovering which conceptual assumption a general theory of the Universe may be based on.

Sincerely
Philippe de Bellescize

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cher Valdi Ingthorsson,

Présentisme et conception aristotélicienne de la causalité sont liés.

D'ailleurs vous avez écrit: "(have just pushed the button to send of a grant application for "Neo-Aristotelian Presentism)"

Le sujet traité dans mon dernier livre "Et si Einstein s'était trompé sur un point capital dans son analyse aboutissant à la relativité restreinte" et la lettre circulaire du 14/02/2018 pourrait à mon avis être formulé de manière purement logique et mathématique. J'espère trouver un jour des bonnes volontés à ce sujet, car ce n'est pas de ma compétence. Vous pourriez traiter ce point dans votre projet. L'avantage d'une telle démonstration, c'est, qu'a partir de là, le monde scientifique serait bien obligé d'admettre le bien fondé de ce positionnement.

Voilà ce qu'il faut à mon avis démontrer d'un point de vue logique et mathématique:

A) l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière, deuxième postulat de la relativité restreinte, implique la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique.

Relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique:

(Si on se place dans le cadre de l'expérience de pensée du train d'Einstein.)

Lorsque les deux observateurs sont à la même distance des deux sources lumineuses – c’est-à-dire quand ils sont l’un en face de l’autre –, le rayon lumineux à l’arrière du train est censé exister vis-à-vis de l’observateur de la gare et non vis-à-vis de celui du train.

B) La relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique aboutit à des contradictions.

Se reporter à l'objection de la navette et du missile: la prise en compte de l'existence du missile en fonction de ce qui est montré sur le diagramme d'espace-temps - ce qui est la stricte application du principe de relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique - aboutit à deux calculs contradictoires en ce qui concerne la position du missile par rapport à la navette.

Voir le diagramme d'espace-temps sur cette vidéo, le texte est lu par un comédien en anglais:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZLSlDn4W_8&feature=youtu.be

C) Cela veut dire qu'il y a une simultanéité absolue au niveau physique, car il n'y a pas de tierce possibilité. De ce fait la vitesse de la lumière ne peut pas être dans tous les cas de figure invariante.

La notion de simultanéité absolue conduit au présentisme: "il y a un instant présent pour l'Univers" - car ce qui est "présent pour un observateur" est aussi ce qui est "présent pour un autre observateur".

Il ne s'agit pas de traiter ce sujet dans cette discussion, mais vous pourriez en tenir compte dans votre futur projet. La remise en cause de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte est une étape importante, dans la réflexion permettant de découvrir sur quel postulat conceptuel une théorie générale de l'Univers peut reposer.

Cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (11-05-2018 13:55)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   11-05-2018 10:32

(Translated by Google Translate, I would do it can be translated if necessary by EasyTranslate)

Hello,

Or the knowledge of how is likely to enlighten us on the nature of the physical world.

Aristotle arrives at the idea of the first immobile motor and the first mobile using the principle "all that is mu is moved by another". The principle itself seems certain, but not necessarily what is implied in the demonstration. It is understood that a body, other than the first mobile, is necessarily moved by contact. Indeed, a physical body, by itself, can move another body only by acting by contact. We therefore admit, implicitly at the beginning, that the setting in motion of a body is necessarily done by an action by contact, to arrive at a particular body, the first mobile, which itself would not be moved by contact. Therefore, what was initially admitted implicitly in Aristotle's reasoning, as regards the setting in motion of a body, is called into question in the rest of the reasoning with regard to the first mobile, which is may be the sign of a flaw in the demonstration.

One can keep the principle that everything is moved by another, but it must demonstrate that a moving body is moved. It is a question of showing, contrary to what current science thinks, that every movement implies a present cause, and, once this point is admitted, we must ask ourselves if the whole of the movements of the physical world is not due to a mechanical current cause. Indeed, if this were the case, we would not need to go back to a first engine. It should be noted that a mechanical cause may very well, in theory, be at the origin of a movement. For example, if an arc were formed by a continuous quantity, there would be, at a given moment at least, more need to go back to a first motor distinct from the quantized material. The question is to see if we can generalize this to the whole physical world.


However, we note that a body tends to pursue an initiated movement, it is also one of the aspects of what we seek to formalize by the notion of inertia. And one can conclude that a mechanical cause can not, at least in all cases, be responsible for the continuation of the initiated movement, because the "mechanical" cause lasts only one time. Which brings us, once the necessity of a present cause has been proved, to the necessity of a non-mechanical cause. We see here that the knowledge of how can enlighten us on the necessity of a driving principle other than matter in its quantitative reality, and also to discover what its mode of action may be. At the same time it tells us that the way Aristotle used the initial principles of understanding is not necessarily completely appropriate.

With the notion of inertia, what one considers, from a certain point of view, as a "state of movement", can be considered from another point of view as "a state of rest", everything depends of the reference system that is used to describe the evolution of the position of the body. This idea, on the one hand, has its interest, because in the physical universe one cannot find an absolute reference, on the other hand one must not too quickly conclude that all the inertial references are equivalent to describe the laws of the nature. We do not have an absolute reference to describe the movement of a body, because, on the one hand, we do not know if space is a container, and on the other hand, even if the space was a container, it would not necessarily be possible to know what movement has such a body in relation to it. This helps to realize that the notion of inertia is not so easy to reconcile with that of a driving principle for the physical world, and this is a particularly interesting point to study. Indeed, in this framework of understanding, if we need a driving principle to account for "the state of motion", it is also necessary that the motor principle must take into account the "state of rest", since two states would be, at least from one point of view, equivalent. Now we can notice that in a relational approach of space and motion, if the relation between bodies is not only mechanical, the "state of rest" as motion would be due to the action of the motor principle. In a relational approach to space and movement, it is through the evolution of the actual relationship between bodies that bodies are set in motion, so the current state of space is due to this relationship.

A moving body tends to pursue an initiated movement, so a body at rest tends to resist its movement, this resistance being proportional to its mass. The thought experience of Einstein's lift contributes to a new perception of inertia. It is the same thing of accelerating a body steadily in space as to hold a body in its fall, while it is subject to a particular gravitational field. This makes it possible to think that there is, at least in first approximation, an equivalence between the inert mass and the heavy mass. For Newton, the inertial trajectory that the moon should have is curved by the attraction of the earth, whereas for Einstein, the space itself is curved. A body in free fall being in "state of inertia", and it would only follow the curvature of the space. To brake a body in free fall, for general relativity, is to accelerate it, since a body in free fall would be in a "state of inertia".

Even if the laws of physics are not necessarily adequate to reality, because they remain linked to angles of abstraction, from another point of view, they tell us something of the physical world order. From a philosophical point of view, the analysis of the inertia of general relativity misses the notion of current cause for any movement, and it is only in a totally relational approach to space and movement that should be taken into account. For general relativity, space is still a container, because it is not the relation between the bodies that is the cause of the movement. Similarly, as with the relativity of simultaneity at the physical level, there is no instant present for the universe, it is difficult in this context to talk about the current state of space or the Universe.

A relational approach of space makes it possible to link the idea of gravity as an immediate relation between the bodies, with the idea of curvature of space in its relation to the masses in presence. The Earth would have a direct and indirect relation with the moon, direct by means of the motor principle, and indirect by the effect that it has, always by means of the driving principle, on the particles allowing the space of to expand. Strictly speaking, it is not that the Earth attracts the moon, but that the driving principle would act in an immanent and interrelated way. Or otherwise, Earth would attract the moon through the motor principle. If we admit that attraction exists, we must also admit that it can not be a purely mechanical phenomenon. It is essential to discover the mode of action of the motor principle, because it is likely to offer us a key to reading for all the rest. Indeed if the driving principle of the physical world acts in this way there, it allows to pose a conceptual postulate and thus to arrive gradually at a relational definition of some initial concepts of physics such as: mass, space , inertia, impulse and time. It is, in my opinion, with the analysis of impulse that we will find the origin of the principle of equivalence. Whereas with the idea of the first motive of Aristotle, one can not really arrive at defining these initial concepts, because one can not reach a rule of analysis of the physical phenomena.


Thought experiments have an important role in the progression of scientific knowledge. It is a question of seeing, once certain principles of understanding are posed, what will happen in a given situation (analysis of how). Or on the contrary, we start from the analysis of the how, to see what we can discover as initial principle of understanding. In my objections to the conception of the time of special relativity, I show that the principle of relativity of simultaneity at the physical level, in a given situation, will lead to contradictions. The relativity principle of simultaneity at the physical level is implicitly posited by the experience of the Einstein train. It is, moreover, the necessary consequence of the postulate of the invariance of the speed of light. It was nonetheless interesting to ask this principle, because as it leads to contradictions, it makes it possible to demonstrate with certainty that there is in fact an absolute simultaneity at the physical level, because there is no third possibility (and therefore there is a moment present for the Universe). On the other hand, the experience of Einstein's elevator, which is undoubtedly one of the ideas at the origin of general relativity, can be used in the search for a general theory of the Universe.


The idea of a conceptual postulate, for physics, is also to start from an initial principle of understanding to see what it will give us as knowledge of how. The movement is twofold, we start from the analysis of how to see what it will give us as a principle of understanding, and we operate a return to the analysis of how. It's a bit like a thought experiment, but at the most basic level possible. The role of a conceptual postulate, in a general theory of the Universe, is to find the most fundamental principles of understanding, and for that we must take account of causal analysis. And from my point of view, the most fundamental principle of understanding is the discovery of the mode of action of the motor principle. For if we have a driving principle that acts in an immanent and interrelated manner, as we can not go back to infinity in the order of causes, it means that we need two initial principles of understanding to understand the physical world: the driving principle and the constituents. But the work does not stop there because it has many philosophical, scientific and theological consequences.

Best regards

Philippe de Bellescize


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bonjour,

Ou la connaissance du comment est susceptible de nous éclairer sur la nature du monde physique.

Aristote arrive à l'idée du premier moteur immobile et du premier mobile en utilisant le principe "tout ce qui est mu est mu par un autre". Le principe en lui-même paraît certain, mais pas forcément ce qui est sous entendu dans la démonstration. Il est sous entendu qu'un corps, autre que le premier mobile, est nécessairement mû par contact. En effet, un corps physique, par lui-même, ne peut mouvoir un autre corps qu'en agissant par contact. On admet donc, implicitement au départ, que la mise en mouvement d'un corps se fait nécessairement par une action par contact, pour arriver à un corps particulier, le premier mobile, qui lui-même ne serait pas mû par contact. Donc, ce qui a été admis implicitement au départ dans le raisonnement d'Aristote, en ce qui concerne la mise en mouvement d'un corps, est remis en cause dans la suite du raisonnement pour ce qui concerne le premier mobile, ce qui est peut être le signe d'une faille dans la démonstration.

On peut garder le principe tout ce qui est mû est mû par un autre, mais encore faut il démontrer qu'un corps en mouvement est mû. Il s'agit de montrer, à l'inverse de ce que pense la science actuelle, que tout mouvement implique une cause actuelle, puis, une fois ce point admis, il faut se demander si l'ensemble des mouvements du monde physique n'est pas dû à une cause actuelle mécanique. En effet, si tel était le cas, on n'aurait pas besoin de remonter à un premier moteur. Il faut remarquer qu'une cause mécanique peut très bien, en théorie, être à l'origine d'un mouvement. Par exemple, si un arc était formé par une quantité continue, on aurait, à un moment donné au moins, plus besoin de remonter à un premier moteur distinct de la matière quantifiée. La question étant de voir si on peut généraliser cela à l'ensemble du monde physique.

Or, on constate qu'un corps à tendance à poursuivre un mouvement initié, c'est d'ailleurs un des aspects de ce que l'on cherche à formaliser par la notion d'inertie. Et l'on peut arriver à conclure qu'une cause mécanique ne peut pas, au moins dans tous les cas de figure, être responsable de la poursuite du mouvement initié, car la cause "mécanique" ne dure qu'un temps. Ce qui nous amène, une fois démontré la nécessité d'une cause actuelle, à la nécessité d'une cause non mécanique. On voit ici, que la connaissance du comment, peut nous éclairer sur la nécessité d'un principe moteur autre que la matière dans sa réalité quantitative, et à découvrir aussi quel peut être son mode d'action. Par la même occasion cela nous indique, que la manière dont Aristote a utilisé les principes initiaux de compréhension, n'est pas forcément complètement appropriée.

Avec la notion d'inertie, ce que l'on considère, d'un certain point de vue, comme un "état de mouvement", peut être considéré d'un autre point de vue comme "un état de repos", tout dépend du référentiel que l'on utilise pour décrire l'évolution de la position du corps. Cette idée, d'un coté a son intérêt, car dans l'univers physique on ne peut pas trouver de référentiel absolu, d'un autre il ne faut pas trop vite conclure que tous les référentiels inertiels sont équivalents pour décrire les lois de la nature. On n'a pas de référentiel absolu pour décrire le mouvement d'un corps, car, d'une part on ne sait pas si l'espace est un contenant, et d'autre part, même si l'espace était un contenant, il ne serait pas forcément possible de savoir quel mouvement a tel corps par rapport à lui. Cela permet de se rendre compte que la notion d'inertie n'est pas si simple à concilier avec celle d'un principe moteur pour le monde physique, et c'est d'ailleurs un point particulièrement intéressant à étudier. En effet, dans ce cadre de compréhension, si on a besoin d'un principe moteur pour rendre compte de "l'état de mouvement", il faut aussi que le principe moteur rende compte de "l'état de repos", puisque les deux états seraient, au moins d'un certain point de vue, équivalents. Or on peut remarquer, que dans une approche relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement, si le rapport entre les corps n'est pas uniquement mécanique, "l'état de repos" comme de mouvement seraient dû à l'action du principe moteur. Dans une approche relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement, c'est par l'évolution de la relation actuelle entre les corps, que les corps sont mis en mouvement, de même l'état actuel de l'espace est dû à cette relation.

Un corps en mouvement à tendance à poursuivre un mouvement initié, de même un corps au repos à tendance à résister à sa mise en mouvement, cette résistance étant proportionnelle à sa masse. L'expérience de pensée de l'ascenseur d'Einstein contribue à une nouvelle perception de l'inertie. Il revient au même d'accélérer un corps de manière constante dans l'espace que de retenir un corps dans sa chute, alors qu'il est soumis à un champ gravitationnel particulier. Ce qui permet de penser qu'il y a, au moins en première approximation, une équivalence entre la masse inerte et la masse pesante. Pour Newton, la trajectoire inertielle que devrait avoir la lune est courbée par l'attraction de la terre, alors que pour Einstein, c'est l'espace lui-même qui est courbé. Un corps en chute libre étant en "état d'inertie", et il ne ferait que suivre la courbure de l'espace. Freiner un corps en chute libre, pour la relativité générale, c'est en fait l'accélérer, puisque qu'un corps en chute libre serait en "état d'inertie".

Même si les lois de la physique ne sont pas forcément adéquates au réel, car elles restent liées à des angles d'abstraction, d'un autre point de vue, elles nous disent quelque chose de l'ordre du monde physique. D'un point de vue philosophique, il manque, à l'analyse de l'inertie de la relativité générale, la notion de cause actuelle pour tout mouvement, et c'est, seulement dans une approche totalement relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement que l'on devrait pouvoir en tenir compte. Pour la relativité générale, l'espace est encore un contenant, car ce n'est pas la relation entre les corps qui est cause du mouvement. De même, comme avec la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique, il n'y a pas d'instant présent pour l'univers, il est difficile dans ce cadre de parler de l'état actuel de l'espace ou de l'Univers.

Une approche relationnelle de l'espace permet de lier l'idée de gravité comme relation immédiate entre les corps, avec l'idée de courbure de l'espace dans son rapport aux masses en présence. La Terre aurait une relation directe et indirecte avec la lune, directe par le moyen du principe moteur, et indirecte par l'effet qu'elle a, toujours par le biais du principe moteur, sur les particules permettant à l'espace de s'étendre. A proprement parler ce n'est pas que la Terre attire la lune, mais c'est que le principe moteur agirait de manière immanente et par interrelation. Ou dit autrement, la Terre attirerait la lune par le biais du principe moteur. Si on admet que l'attraction existe, on doit aussi admettre que cela ne peut pas être un phénomène purement mécanique. Il est essentiel de découvrir le mode d'action du principe moteur, car c'est susceptible de nous offrir une clé de lecture pour tout le reste. En effet si le principe moteur du monde physique agit de cette manière là, cela permet de poser un postulat conceptuel et d'arriver ainsi progressivement à une définition relationnelle de certains concepts initiaux de la physique comme: la masse, l'espace, l'inertie, l'impulsion et le temps. C'est d'ailleurs à mon avis avec l'analyse de l'impulsion que l'on va retrouver l'origine du principe d'équivalence. Alors qu'avec l'idée du premier mobile d'Aristote, on ne peut pas réellement arriver à définir ces concepts initiaux, car on ne peut pas aboutir à une règle d'analyse des phénomènes physiques.

Les expériences de pensée ont un rôle important dans la progression de la connaissance scientifique. Il s'agit de voir, une fois certains principes de compréhension posés, à quoi cela va aboutir dans telle situation donnée (analyse du comment). Ou au contraire, on part de l'analyse du comment, pour voir ce que l'on peut découvrir comme principe initial de compréhension. Dans mes objections en ce qui concerne la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte, je montre que le principe de relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique, dans telle situation donnée, va aboutir à des contradictions. Le principe de relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique étant implicitement posé par l'expérience du train d'Einstein. Il est d'ailleurs la conséquence nécessaire du postulat de l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière. Il était néanmoins intéressant de poser ce principe, car comme il aboutit à des contradictions, cela permet de démontrer de manière certaine qu'il y a en fait une simultanéité absolue au niveau physique, car il n'y a pas de tierce possibilité (et donc qu'il y a un instant présent pour l'Univers). Par contre, l'expérience de l'ascenseur d'Einstein, qui est sans doute une des idées à l'origine de la relativité générale, peut être utilisée dans la recherche d'une théorie générale de l'Univers.

L'idée d'un postulat conceptuel, pour la physique, est aussi de partir d'un principe initial de compréhension pour voir ce que cela va nous donner comme connaissance du comment. Le mouvement est double, on part de l'analyse du comment pour voir ce que cela va nous donner comme principe de compréhension, et on opère un retour à l'analyse du comment. C'est un peu comme une expérience de pensée, mais au niveau le plus fondamental possible. Le rôle d'un postulat conceptuel, dans une théorie générale de l'Univers, c'est de trouver les principes de compréhension les plus fondamentaux, et pour cela il faut tenir compte de l'analyse causale. Et de mon point de vue, le principe de compréhension le plus fondamental est la découverte du mode d'action du principe moteur. Car si on a un principe moteur qui agit de manière immanente et par interrelation, comme on ne peut pas remonter à l'infini dans l'ordre des causes, cela veut dire que l'on à besoin de deux principes initiaux de compréhension pour comprendre le monde physique: le principe moteur et les constituants. Mais le travail ne s'arrête par là car cela à beaucoup de conséquences philosophiques, scientifiques et théologiques.

Bien cordialement

Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (12-05-2018 05:40)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: RD Ingthorsson 
Date:   11-05-2018 17:07

Dear Ph de Bellescize

I agree that Aristotelianism and Presentism go hand in hand. Indeed I have argued that Presentism needs an Aristotelian metaphysical core (see: https://www.academia.edu/32901893/Challenging_the_Grounding_Objection_to_Presentism). In fact, my next project is called "Neo-Aristotelian Presentism". A grant proposal is under consideration by the Swedish Research Council.

However, I feel unequipped to address the problem within a relativistic setting. I do hope I can get someone with real expertise to collaborate with me on that issue, or someone work in parallell.

-----------------------------------

Cher Ph de Bellescize

Je suis d'accord que l'aristotélisme et le présentisme vont de pair. En effet, j'ai soutenu que le Presentisme a besoin d'un noyau métaphysique aristotélicien (voir: https://www.academia.edu/32901893/Challenging_the_Grounding_Objection_to_Presentism). En fait, mon prochain projet s'appelle "Presentismo néo-aristotélicien". Une proposition de subvention est en cours d'examen par le Conseil suédois de la recherche.

Cependant, je ne me sens pas équipé pour aborder le problème dans un contexte relativiste. J'espère que je peux trouver quelqu'un avec une réelle expertise pour collaborer avec moi sur cette question, ou que quelqu'un travaille en parallèle.

Cordialement

Valdi

Valdi

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   12-05-2018 12:22

Translated by google translate

Dear Valdi Ingthorsson,

I tried to make a copied paste of the text you just said to translate it, but it does not work very well. I will re-register at Académia.

It is not easy, for time scientists, to admit that there is something like a house that they have not seen for more than 100 years. But, in fact, in a search everyone can contribute if the work is sufficiently persevering. It is also a fair return, because scientists, for 100 years, told philosophers that they could not think things the same way. Whereas today we are returning to the conception of Aristotle's time. Personally I was rather guided by the intuition, because I do not have competence in logic and in mathematics. In addition, a few years ago, I had significant health problems that limited my ability to work and research.

Scientists and philosophers recipients of the circular letter of 14/02/2018, have not reacted, or if they reacted it is a little bad mood. A scientist, a specialist in relativity, began to tell me that the tone I was using did not make him so keen to show me or was my mistake. I thought then good to answer him "for you it is obvious that I am wrong" by putting a copy to the other participants. His immediate response was then to say, "to, but no, I did not say that at all"(I did not quote the exact words, but that's the meaning of what was said). I think he had not seen the ins and outs of the argument in enough detail. When, because of the nervousness, he dug a little, he undoubtedly saw that it was not so simple to answer. In my opinion, once we understand that the invariance of the speed of light implies the relativity of simultaneity at the physical level, as defined at the end of section A of the circular letter, the argumentation becomes unavoidable. I intend to continue my relational work, so that we arrive on this subject to a purely logical and mathematical formulation. If, by the way, I found someone interested, I could put him in touch with you.

The questioning, in a certain and scientific way, of the conception of the time of the special relativity, will lead to a major conceptual upheaval. We may be at a crossroads, philosophy, physics and even theology converge. After the work that is interesting to do, it is to see exactly on what conceptual postulate a general theory of the universe can rest. And once this conceptual principle is put in place, we must be able to analyze the various consequences. I have been thinking about it for over 25 years, but I am not an academic. It would be necessary that people more competent than me, considering the interest of this problematic, do a thorough work on this subject. The form of my book "The Motor Principle of the Universe and the Space-Time" is imperfect (especially chapter 12), but some ideas would be to resume in a more elaborate form. I can, in case, you communicate the files in French of my last two books, if it can be useful for your project. I think it is a topic of cultural significance for our society, and my goal, at least today, is not to do my little personal work in my own area. I would be very happy if someone could take advantage of certain aspects of my analysis to go further. A relational conception is also the enhancement of everyone's gift.

Best regards
Philippe de Bellescize


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cher Valdi Ingthorsson,

J'ai essayé de faire un copié coller du texte, que vous venez d'indiquer, pour le traduire, mais cela ne fonctionne pas très bien. Je vais en cas me réinscrire à Académia.

Il n'est pas facile, pour les scientifiques spécialistes de la question du temps, d'admettre qu'il y a quelque chose, de gros comme une maison, qu'ils n'ont pour la majorité pas vu depuis plus de 100 ans. Mais, en fait, dans une recherche chacun peut apporter sa pierre si le travail est suffisamment persévérant. C'est d'ailleurs un juste retour des choses, car les scientifiques, depuis 100 ans, ont dit aux philosophes qu'ils ne pouvaient plus penser les choses de la même manière. Alors qu'aujourd'hui nous sommes en train de revenir à la conception du temps d'Aristote. Personnellement j'ai plutôt été guidé par l'intuition, car je n'ai pas de compétence en logique et en mathématique. De plus, il y a quelques années, j'ai eu des problèmes de santé importants qui limitent mes capacités de travail et de recherche.

Les scientifiques et les philosophes destinataires de la lettre circulaire du 14/02/2018, n'ont pas réagi, ou s'ils ont réagi c'est un peu avec mauvaise humeur. Un scientifique, spécialiste de la relativité, a commencé à me dire que, le ton que j'employais, ne l'incitait pas tellement à me montrer ou était mon erreur. J'ai cru bon alors de lui répondre "pour vous il est évident que je me trompe" en mettant une copie aux autres participants. Sa réponse immédiate à alors été de dire, "à, mais non, je n'ai pas du tout dit cela"(je n'ai pas cité les mot exacts, mais c'est le sens de ce qui a été dit). Je crois qu'en fait il n'avait pas vu de manière suffisamment précise les tenants et aboutissants de l'argumentation. Quand, du fait de l'énervement, il a un peu creusé, il a sans doute vu qu'il n'était pas si simple d'y répondre. A mon avis, une fois que l'on a compris que l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière implique la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique, telle qu'elle est définie en fin de section A de la lettre circulaire, l'argumentation devient incontournable. Je compte continuer mon travail relationnel, pour que l'on arrive sur ce sujet à une formulation purement logique et mathématique. Si d'ailleurs, je trouvais quelqu'un d'intéressé, je pourrais le mettre en contact avec vous.

La remise en cause, de manière certaine et scientifique, de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte, va aboutir à un bouleversement conceptuel majeur. Nous sommes peut-être à la croisée des chemins, la philosophie, la physique et même la théologie, convergent. Après le travail qu'il est intéressant de faire, c'est de voir exactement sur quel postulat conceptuel une théorie générale de l'univers peut reposer. Et, une fois ce principe conceptuel posé, il faut pouvoir analyser les diverses conséquences. Je réfléchis à ce sujet depuis plus de 25 ans, mais je ne suis pas un universitaire. Il faudrait que des personnes plus compétentes que moi, au vu de l'intérêt de cette problématique, fassent un travail de fond sur ce sujet. La forme de mon livre "Le Principe Moteur de l'Univers et l'Espace-Temps" est imparfaite (particulièrement le chapitre 12), mais certaines idées seraient à reprendre dans une forme plus élaborée. Je peux, en cas, vous communiquer les fichiers en français de mes deux derniers livres, si cela peut être utile à votre projet. Je pense qu'il s'agit d'un sujet ayant une portée culturelle très importante pour notre société, et mon objectif n'est pas du tout, au moins aujourd'hui, d'effectuer mon petit travail personnel dans mon coin. Je serais très heureux que quelqu'un puisse profiter, de certains aspects de mon analyse, pour aller plus loin. Une conception relationnelle c'est aussi la mise en valeur du don de chacun.

Bien cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (14-05-2018 17:09)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   20-05-2018 08:44

Dear Valdi Ingthorsson,

(translated by google Translate)

I was a little busy with discussions with scientists about my objection to the conception of the time of special relativity.

I read, the article that you indicate in your previous message, a few days ago, and I do not have any more details present in memory. It would be necessary to speak well that I read it again. In addition, the translated text does not necessarily correspond exactly to what you meant. It seems to me that you want to answer certain objections regarding presentism, for example that we could not really talk about the past if the past is no more. We can probably show in a purely logical way that this is a sophism, we should have the opinion of Stagire and Mr. Delaporte on this subject.

At the level of physics there are, no doubt, also many objections to presentism, but they are of a different order. The conception of the time of the special relativity leads to eternalism - one can look with profit what wikipedia says on the eternalism. I think it can be said that eternalism is based on the idea of relativity of simultaneity at the physical level. Indeed, if when two observers are "in the same position", while they are moving relative to each other, an event according to a line of simultaneity exists for the one and not yet for the other, it means with regard to this event that the time would already be written. But, from the moment when it is shown that the relativity of simultaneity at the physical level leads to contradictions, it also demonstrates as there is no third possibility, that there is an absolute simultaneity and therefore a present moment for the Universe, which is not compatible with eternalism.

The relativity constraint is given a philosophical frame of interpretation to justify its positioning, which tends to mask the scope of the objection as regards the relativity of the simultaneity on the physical level. Mainly we consider that we have an absolute past, or an absolute future, when we are in the cone of light past or future, and a past and a non-absolute future when we are in the elsewhere, the temporal order between the events that can change in the elsewhere. This interpretation is related to the relativity of simultaneity at the physical level, which is itself related to the belief in the invariance of the speed of light with respect to all inertial reference frames. But, in my opinion, it is possible to demonstrate in a purely mathematical and logical manner that this interpretation is false.

Indeed one can, if one admits that an event has indeed taken place if it is in the past cone, and if one also admits that the speed of light is invariant, carry out a reconstruction in order to know when such ray of light has was issued for the observer A. For this it is sufficient to know the distance of the light source. And a priori we can do the same thing for an observer B moving with respect to A. We know, therefore, by reconstruction, what time marked the clock of A, when the ray 1 light was emitted. For example, A's clock marked 10 o'clock. Yet at that moment the ray of light was not yet in the cone of light past. Now imagine that sitting next to A, at 10 o'clock, there is an A '. And that at 10 hours 10 seconds, A 'accelerates to join B. You must admit that ray 1 was sent for A', before it accelerates, and yet it can join B, in some cases of figure, before the ray of light 1 was emitted for B. Indeed one can make the same reconstruction that one did for A for B. One can try to say that the ray of light which was emitted for A ' at 10 o'clock, was finally not issued for A 'at that time. But that, sorry for the physicists in favor of the special relativity, is not possible. Because A ', at that moment, had the same position as A. The objection of the shuttle and the missile is only taking again this state of fact, it is enough to replace the ray of light by a missile. (see video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZLS...ature=youtu.be). I personally think that there is no flaw in this reasoning. And all that has just been said should be formulated in a purely logical and mathematical way. We are talking about this subject with mach3 on my forum. So, from my point of view, the question of the conception of the time of the special relativity, from which eternalism originates, can be regulated in a purely mathematical and logical way. All good wishes on this subject will be welcome.

The question of presentism once settled, we must go further. On this subject I began yesterday to look at academia two other texts that interested me, but I have not yet had enough time to dig:

https://www.academia.edu/343533/Causal_Production_as_Interaction
https://www.academia.edu/35164635/Presentism_and_Cross-Time_Relations

cordially
Philippe de Bellescize


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cher Valdi Ingthorsson,

J'étais un peu occupé par des discussions avec des scientifiques au sujet de mon objection en ce qui concerne la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte.

J'ai lu, l'article que vous indiquez dans votre précédent message, il y a quelques jours, et je n'ai plus tous les détails présents en mémoire. Il faudrait pour bien en parler que je le relise. De plus le texte traduit ne correspond pas forcément exactement à ce que vous avez voulu dire. Il me semble que vous voulez répondre à certaines objections en ce qui concerne le présentisme, par exemple que l'on ne pourrait pas en vérité parler du passé si le passé n'est plus. On peut sans doute montrer de manière purement logique qu'il s'agit d'un sophisme, il faudrait avoir l'avis de Stagire et de monsieur Delaporte sur ce sujet.

An niveau de la physique il y a, sans doute, aussi beaucoup d'objections en ce qui concerne le présentisme, mais elles sont d'un autre ordre. La conception du temps de la relativité restreinte conduit à l'éternalisme - on peut regarder avec profit ce que dit wikipédia sur l'éternalisme. Je pense que l'on peut dire que l'éternalisme repose sur l'idée de relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique. En effet, si lorsque deux observateurs sont "à la même position", alors qu'ils sont en mouvement l'un par rapport à l'autre, un événement selon une ligne de simultanéité existe pour l'un et pas encore pour l'autre, cela veut dire en ce qui concerne cet événement que le temps serait déjà écrit. Mais, à partir du moment où l'on démontre que la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique aboutit à des contradictions, cela démontre aussi comme il n'y a pas de tierce possibilité, qu'il y a une simultanéité absolue et donc un instant présent pour l'Univers, ce qui n'est pas compatible avec l'éternalisme.

La relativité retreinte c'est donné un cadre philosophique d'interprétation pour justifier son positionnement, qui tend à masquer la portée de l'objection en ce qui concerne la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique. Principalement on considère que l'on a un passé absolu, ou un futur absolu, quand on est dans le cône de lumière passé ou futur, et un passé et un futur non absolus quand on est dans l'ailleurs, l'ordre temporel entre les événements pouvant changer dans l'ailleurs. Cette interprétation est liée à la relativité de la simultanéité au niveau physique, qui est elle-même liée à la croyance en l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière par rapport à tous les référentiels inertiels. Mais on peut, à mon avis, démontrer de manière purement mathématique et logique que cette interprétation est fausse.


En effet on peut, si on admet qu'un événement a bien eu lieu s'il est dans le cône passé, et si on admet aussi que la vitesse de la lumière est invariante, effectuer une reconstruction afin de savoir quand tel rayon lumineux a été émis pour l'observateur A. Pour cela il suffit de connaître la distance de la source lumineuse. Et a priori on peut faire la même chose pour un observateur B en mouvement par rapport à A. On sait donc, par reconstruction, quelle heure marquait l'horloge de A, quand le rayon 1 lumineux a été émis. Par exemple l'horloge de A marquait 10 heure. Pourtant à ce moment là le rayon lumineux n'était pas encore dans le cône de lumière passé. Maintenant, imaginez qu'assis à coté de A, à 10 heure, il y ait un A'. Et qu'à 10 heure 10 seconde cet A' accélère pour rejoindre B. Vous devez admettre que le rayon 1 a bien été émis pour A', avant que celui-ci n'accélère, et pourtant il peut rejoindre B, dans certains cas de figure, avant que le rayon lumineux 1 ait été émis pour B. En effet on peut faire la même reconstruction que l'on à fait pour A pour B. On peut essayer de dire que le rayon lumineux qui a été émis pour A' à 10 heure, n'a finalement pas été émis pour A' à cette heure là. Mais cela, désolé pour les physiciens partisans de la relativité restreinte, n'est pas possible. Car A', à ce moment là, avait la même position que A. L'objection de la navette et du missile ne fait que reprendre cet état de fait, il suffit de remplacer le rayon lumineux par un missile. (voir vidéo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZLS...ature=youtu.be ). Je pense, personnellement, qu'il n'y a pas de faille dans ce raisonnement. Et tout ce qui vient d'être dit devrait pouvoir être formulé de manière purement logique et mathématique. Nous sommes en train de parler de ce sujet avec mach3 sur mon forum. Donc, de mon point de vue, la question de la conception du temps de la relativité restreinte, dont est issu l'éternalisme, peut être réglée de manière purement mathématique et logique. Toutes les bonnes volontés à ce sujet seront les bienvenues.

La question du présentisme une fois réglé, il faut aller plus loin. A ce sujet j'ai commencé hier à regarder sur académia deux autres de vos textes qui m'ont intéressé, mais je n'ai pas encore suffisamment eu le temps de creuser:

https://www.academia.edu/343533/Causal_Production_as_Interaction
https://www.academia.edu/35164635/Presentism_and_Cross-Time_Relations

Cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (21-05-2018 06:17)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   20-05-2018 08:45

Dear Valdi Ingthorsson,

In your article:

https://www.academia.edu/35164635/Presentism_and_Cross-Time_Relations

You write:

l discuss whether it really would be so inconceivable to accept that we can only have justified belief about the future and past. Below, I’ll very briefly sketch my argument in each case. Powers-based accounts of causation, at least those which build on the Aristotelian tradition, represent a reaction to the standard view that causation is at rock bottom a two-place relation between temporally distinct entities. Instead they depict causal relations as a product of a more fundamental phenomenon; interaction between powerful particulars. In other words, causal relations are not constitutive of causation but in fact are the consequence of causation. On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co-existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics. The interaction does not really bear a relation to its effect, but produces it. The influence exerted between the components of the system, provokes a change in each component and thus also in the system of which they are constituents."


This sentence seems to me particularly interesting to discuss:

" I will argue that presentism is at least compatible with the possibility of true justified belief, notably about those features of reality that always obtain, like the laws of nature. And I wil"On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co-existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics."

In my opinion, there are several things to remember:

Causality can only be exercised in the present moment. It is by the evolution of the physical system that there is a relation between the antecedent and the consequent. And it is through an interaction between the elements of the physical system that there is an evolution of the physical system - this point being particularly important, we will be able to talk about it later, because everything starts from there. I believe, that on these points, we join together.

The question that will arise is whether to opt, and if you opt, from what you say in this sentence, for a purely relational approach of space and movement? And, if so, how from there find the analysis by the four causes?

______________

This is the discussion we had with Mr. Delaporte on the question of the exercise of causes in the present moment (quoted in my book "The Motor Principle of the Universe and Space-Time" from page 107 ):

Translated by google translation


"Dear Mr. Delaporte

You wrote:

"I can only repeat what I have already told you: in time, there is no instant, as in the moment, there is no time, just as in the line there is no point and in the point there is no line.
There is no moment that lasts, it is contradictory. "

You are right in thinking that instant and duration are, in their immediate definitions, opposite. But when we speak of instant-present we want to mean, it seems to me, something very special. There is a limit between the past and the future, it is the present moment. But we must also say that this limit evolves according to the course of time, and we even talk about living the present moment. If we consider that the frontier between the past and the future is not thick, it raises the question of how we can live the present moment. The moment-present has a duration not because the limit between the past and the future has a thickness, and in this we can speak of moment, but because time is running, we are present at this unfolding and that being itself is the cause of this unfolding. If there were no instant-present there would be no time flow either.

If we consider that the present moment is the border between the past and the future, it is also necessary that the exercise of the causes be present at this moment. Indeed, there can be no exercise of causes without a present cause. Causality is not only the relation between the antecedent and the consequent, but it is what accounts for existence, being, becoming, and movement. Fate and movement are necessarily based on existing causes from the point of view of being, these causes necessarily being present in the present moment, because the present moment refers to what exists from the point of view of the to be at the moment t. To consider that the causes are not present in the moment is to consider that in the moment the being does not exist. And if being does not exist in the moment, how could it exist later? Moreover, what will come later can only be present in the present moment.

How do you prove that in the line there is no point, and that in the passage of time there is no instant, and there is no instant-present? It seems to me that one can very well consider a point in a line and a moment in a duration. The First Being is present in the present moment, matter is present in the present moment, causality is present in the present moment. It is because there is presence of being at time t that we can speak of instant-present ".


Mr. Delaporte's answer:

"Dear Philippe,

"There is a limit between the past and the future, it is the present moment"

Yes. The present moment, or the "now" as Aristotle says, is at the same time the limit between the past and the future, as well as their junction. The present moment is in itself both a term of the past and a principle of the future. One in reality and multiple in notions.


"The question arises as to how one can live the present moment"

This is the question that arises, the same as before: how to explain the sustainable movement, if there is no movement in the moment?

"These causes being necessarily present in the present moment"

They are present as beings of such and such nature, certainly, but not as "cause", that is to say, actually exercising their causality, because the exercise of natural causality is a movement which is done in time and not in the moment. Even the coming to being, which is instantaneous, supposes an earlier generation movement, of which it is the term. "


My answer :

"Dear Mr. Delaporte

In the moment we do not see movement and yet causality can only be present in the present moment. Movement implies that reality moves from one state to another. When two bodies move away from each other, the state of the universe is not the same from one moment to the next. This is why we can say that the movement is the act of what is in power as long as it is in power. Something must account for the power (the existence of the body at such a position) and something must account for the passage from power to act (the change of state for the universe). We can say that this passage is not immediate, because the body is successively at various positions.

Moreover, we compare a movement to another movement to count the time. It seems to me that one can say, as the movement is not present in the moment, and that what is cause must be present in the moment, that it is the mutation of the state in which find the reality that is the cause of the movement, not the other way around. When two bodies are moving relative to each other, it is because of a mutation of the state of the universe, and the question is to see if it is the contraction or the dilation of the space that is the cause of the movement. Indeed, it raises the question of how reality passes from one state to another, which can tell us what it means for the reality of being in such a state. It is not known at this stage what allows these mutations. He wonders why this mutation takes time (why the body does not move immediately from one position to another) and whether this mutation corresponds to a mutation of being.

To account for movement and therefore time, we need a current cause whose modalities evolve gradually. From the moment when it is said that it is the change of state of the universe that produces the movement and not the movement that produces the change of state, it must be found that it is the cause of change. origin of the change of state. Is the cause at the origin of the change of state a cause external to the universe or is it the relation between the bodies? At this point we can not, I believe, discern. But the difficulty that comes with analyzing the motion of projection is that, if the cause of the movement was an extrinsic cause to the universe, when I am at the origin of the movement, the extrinsic cause should conform to my wish. I believe that the only way to solve this difficulty is to consider that, in the motion of projection, the cause of the movement must be a cause acting in an immanent manner and in a manner conjointly with the soul.

You wrote, quoting me:

"These causes being necessarily present in the present moment"

They are present as beings of such and such nature, certainly, but not as "cause", that is to say, actually exercising their causality, because the exercise of natural causality is a movement which is done in time and not in the moment. Even the coming to being, which is instantaneous, supposes an earlier generation movement, of which it is the term.

"You can not say that, because you still have to see what accounts for the state of reality at time t. If it is not causality that accounts for the state of reality at time t, you do not have anything that can account for the movement either. "


Mr. Delaporte's answer:

"It is the change of state of the universe that would be the cause of the movement"

Bravo! you have the key. It only remains for you to think about what is meant by "change of state"

Sincerely, The host »


cordially

Philippe de Bellescize


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cher Valdi Ingthorsson,

Dans votre article:

https://www.academia.edu/35164635/Presentism_and_Cross-Time_Relations

Vous écrivez :

" I will argue that presentism is at least compatible with the possibility of true justified belief, notably about those features of reality that always obtain, like the laws of nature. And I will discuss whether it really would be so inconceivable to accept that we can only have justified belief about the future and past. Below, I’ll very briefly sketch my argument in each case. Powers-based accounts of causation, at least those which build on the Aristotelian tradition, represent a reaction to the standard view that causation is at rock bottom a two-place relation between temporally distinct entities. Instead they depict causal relations as a product of a more fundamental phenomenon; interaction between powerful particulars. In other words, causal relations are not constitutive of causation but in fact are the consequence of causation. On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co-existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics. The interaction does not really bear a relation to its effect, but produces it. The influence exerted between the components of the system, provokes a change in each component and thus also in the system of which they are constituents."

" Je soutiendrai que le présentisme est au moins compatible avec la possibilité d'une vraie croyance justifiée, notamment sur les caractéristiques de la réalité qui s'obtiennent toujours, comme les lois de la nature. Et je discuterai de la question de savoir s'il serait vraiment inconcevable d'accepter que nous ne pouvons avoir qu'une croyance justifiée concernant l'avenir et le passé. Ci-dessous, je vais esquisser très brièvement mon argument dans chaque cas. Les rapports de causalité fondés sur les pouvoirs, du moins ceux qui s'appuient sur la tradition aristotélicienne, représentent une réaction à l'opinion courante selon laquelle la causalité est à la base d'une relation à deux endroits entre des entités temporellement distinctes. Au contraire, ils décrivent les relations causales comme le produit d'un phénomène plus fondamental; interaction entre des particuliers puissants. En d'autres termes, les relations causales ne sont pas constitutives de la causalité, mais sont en fait la conséquence de la causalité. De ce fait, une cause est une interaction entre deux ou plusieurs données coexistantes qui constituent ensemble ce qu'on appelle un système matériel en physique. L'interaction ne porte pas vraiment de relation à son effet, mais le produit. L'influence exercée entre les composants du système, provoque un changement dans chaque composant et donc aussi dans le système dont ils sont constituants."

Cette phrase me paraît particulièrement intéressante à discuter:

"On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co-existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics."

" De ce fait, une cause est une interaction entre deux ou plusieurs données coexistantes qui constituent ensemble ce qu'on appelle un système matériel en physique." traduit par Google translate

Il faut retenir, à mon avis, plusieurs choses:

La causalité ne peut s'exercer que dans l'instant présent. C'est par l'évolution du système physique qu'il y a un rapport entre l'antécédent et le conséquent. Et c'est par une interaction entre les éléments du système physique qu'il y a une évolution du système physique - ce point étant d'ailleurs particulièrement important, nous pourrons en reparler plus tard, car tout part de là. Je crois, que sur ces points, nous nous rejoignions.

La question qui va se poser est celle de savoir s'il faut opter, et si vous optez, à partir de ce que vous affirmez dans cette phrase, pour une approche purement relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement? Et, si c'est le cas, comment à partir de là retrouver l'analyse par les quatre causes?

_______________

Voilà la discussion que nous avons eue avec monsieur Delaporte sur la question de l'exercice des causes dans l'instant présent (cité dans mon livre "Le Principe Moteur de l'Univers et l'Espace-Temps" à partir de la page 107):

« Cher Monsieur Delaporte

Vous avez écrit :
« Je ne peux vous redire que ce que je vous ai déjà dit : dans le temps, il n'y a pas d'instant, comme dans l'instant, il n'y a pas de temps, de même que dans la ligne, il n'y a pas de point et que dans le point, il n'y a pas de ligne.
Il n'y a pas d'instant qui dure, c'est contradictoire. »

Vous avez raison de penser qu'instant et durée sont, dans leurs définitions immédiates, opposés. Mais quand on parle d'instant-présent on veut signifier, il me semble, quelque chose de bien particulier. Il y a une limite entre le passé et le futur, c'est l'instant présent. Mais il faut aussi dire que cette limite évolue en fonction du déroulement du temps, et on parle même de vivre l'instant-présent. Si on considère que la frontière entre le passé et le futur n'a pas d'épaisseur, il se pose la question de savoir comment on peut vivre l'instant-présent. L'instant-présent a une durée non pas parce que la limite entre le passé et le futur a une épaisseur, et en cela on peut bien parler d'instant, mais parce que le temps se déroule, que nous sommes présents à ce déroulement, et que l'être lui-même est cause de ce déroulement. S'il n'y avait pas d'instant-présent il n'y aurait pas non plus de déroulement du temps.

Si on considère que l'instant présent est la frontière entre le passé et le futur, il faut bien aussi que l'exercice des causes soit présent à cet instant. En effet il ne peut pas y avoir exercice des causes sans cause actuelle. La causalité, ce n'est pas seulement le rapport entre l'antécédent et le conséquent, mais c'est ce qui rend compte de l'existence, de l'être, du devenir, et du mouvement. Le devenir et le mouvement reposent nécessairement sur des causes existantes du point de vue de l'être, ces causes étant nécessairement présentes dans l'instant-présent, car l'instant-présent fait référence à ce qui existe du point de vue de l'être à l'instant t. Considérer que les causes ne sont pas présentes dans l'instant, c'est considérer que dans l'instant l'être n'existe pas. Et, si l'être n'existe pas dans l'instant, comment pourrait-il exister plus tard. D'ailleurs, ce qui viendra plus tard ne pourra être présent que dans l'instant-présent.

Comment démontrez-vous, que dans la ligne il n'y a pas de point, et que dans le déroulement du temps, il n'y a pas d'instant, et il n'y a pas d'instant-présent ? Il me semble que l'on peut très bien considérer un point dans une ligne et un instant dans une durée. L'Être Premier est présent dans l'instant-présent, la matière est présente dans l'instant-présent, la causalité est présente dans l'instant-présent. C'est parce qu'il y a présence de l'être à l'instant t, que l'on peut parler d'instant-présent».


Réponse de Monsieur Delaporte:
«Cher Philippe,

« Il y a une limite entre le passé et le futur, c'est l'instant présent »

Oui. L’instant présent, ou le “maintenant” comme dit Aristote, est bien à la fois la limite entre le passé et le futur, ainsi que leur jonction. L’instant présent est en lui-même à la fois terme du passé et principe du futur. Un en réalité et multiple en notions.

« il se pose la question de savoir comment on peut vivre l'instant-présent »

C’est bien la question qui se pose, la même que précédemment : comment expliquer le mouvement durable, s’il n’y a pas de mouvement dans l’instant ?

« ces causes étant nécessairement présente dans l'instant-présent »

Elles sont présentes en tant qu’êtres de telle ou telle nature, certes, mais pas en tant que “cause”, c’est-à-dire exerçant effectivement leur causalité, car l’exercice de la causalité naturelle est un mouvement qui se fait dans le temps et pas dans l’instant. Même la venue à l’être, qui est instantanée, suppose un mouvement de génération antérieur, dont elle est le terme. »

Ma réponse :

«Cher Monsieur Delaporte

Dans l'instant on ne voit pas de mouvement et pourtant la causalité ne peut être présente que dans l'instant-présent. Le mouvement implique que la réalité passe d'un état à un autre. Quand deux corps s'éloignent l'un de l'autre, l'état de l'univers n'est pas le même d'un instant à l'autre. C'est d'ailleurs pour cela que l'on peut dire que le mouvement est l'acte de ce qui est en puissance en temps qu'il est en puissance. Il faut que quelque chose rende compte de la puissance (l'existence du corps à telle position) et que quelque chose rende compte du passage de la puissance à l'acte (le changement d'état pour l'univers). On peut dire que ce passage n'est pas immédiat, car le corps est successivement à diverses positions. De plus, on compare un mouvement à un autre mouvement pour nombrer le temps.

Il me semble que l'on peut dire, comme le mouvement n'est pas présent dans l'instant, et que ce qui est cause doit être présent dans l'instant, que c'est la mutation de l'état dans lequel se trouve la réalité qui est cause du mouvement, et non pas l'inverse. Quand deux corps sont en mouvement l'un par rapport à l'autre, c'est du fait d'une mutation de l'état de l'univers, et la question est de voir si c'est la contraction ou la dilatation de l'espace qui est cause du mouvement. En effet, il se pose la question de savoir comment la réalité passe d'un état à un autre, ce qui peut nous renseigner sur ce que cela veut dire pour la réalité d'être dans tel état. On ne sait pas à ce stade ce qui permet ces mutations. Il se pose les questions de savoir, pourquoi cette mutation prend du temps (pourquoi le corps ne passe pas immédiatement d'une position à une autre) et si cette mutation correspond à une mutation de l'être.

Pour rendre compte du mouvement et donc du temps, il faut une cause actuelle dont les modalités évoluent de manière progressive. À partir du moment où l'on dit que c'est le changement d'état de l'univers qui produit le mouvement et non pas le mouvement qui produit le changement d'état, on doit trouver qu'elle est la cause à l'origine du changement d'état. La cause à l'origine du changement d'état est-elle une cause extérieure à l'univers ou est-ce la relation entre les corps? À ce stade on ne peut, je crois, pas discerner. Mais la difficulté qui se présente quand on analyse le mouvement de projection, c'est que, si la cause du mouvement était une cause extrinsèque à l'univers, quand je suis à l'origine du mouvement, la cause extrinsèque devrait se conformer à ma volonté. Je crois que la seule façon de résoudre cette difficulté, est de considérer que, dans le mouvement de projection, la cause du mouvement doit être une cause agissant de manière immanente et de manière conjointe avec l'âme.

Vous avez écrit en me citant :

« « Ces causes étant nécessairement présentes dans l'instant-présent »

Elles sont présentes en tant qu’êtres de telle ou telle nature, certes, mais pas en tant que “cause”, c’est-à-dire exerçant effectivement leur causalité, car l’exercice de la causalité naturelle est un mouvement qui se fait dans le temps et pas dans l’instant. Même la venue à l’être, qui est instantanée, suppose un mouvement de génération antérieur, dont elle est le terme. »
Vous ne pouvez pas dire cela, car il faut encore voir ce qui rend compte de l'état de la réalité à l'instant t. Si ce n'est pas la causalité qui rend compte de l'état de la réalité à l'instant t, vous n'avez rien non plus qui peut rendre compte du mouvement.»

Réponse de Monsieur Delaporte:

«« C'est le changement d'état de l'univers qui serait cause du mouvement »
Bravo ! vous avez la clé. Il ne vous reste plus qu’à réfléchir sur ce qu’il faut entendre par “changement d’état”

Cordialement L'animateur»


Cordialement

Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (22-05-2018 06:31)

Répondre à ce message
 
 Re: Sur la distinction acte/potentiel
Auteur: Ph de Bellescize 
Date:   20-05-2018 09:19

Hello,

Here are the points or could engage the discussion (see beginning last message):

This sentence seems to me particularly interesting to discuss:

" I will argue that presentism is at least compatible with the possibility of true justified belief, notably about those features of reality that always obtain, like the laws of nature. And I wil"On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co- existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics." Valdi Ingthorsson

In my opinion, there are several things to remember:

Causality can only be exercised in the present moment. It is by the evolution of the physical system that there is a relation between the antecedent and the consequent. And it is through an interaction between the elements of the physical system that there is an evolution of the physical system - this point being particularly important, we will be able to talk about it later, because everything starts from there. I believe, that on these points, we join together.

The question that will arise is whether to opt, and if you opt, from what you say in this sentence, for a purely relational approach of space and movement? And, if so, how from there find the analysis by the four causes?

_____________

In my opinion it is this point that is not integrated by Aristotle, because they have not discovered the mode of action of the Driving Principle of the physical world:

"And it is through an interaction between the elements of the physical system that there is an evolution of the physical system."

cordially
Philippe de Bellescize

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bonjour,

Voici les points ou pourrait s'engager la discussion (voir début du message précédent).

Cette phrase me paraît particulièrement intéressante à discuter:

"On this account a cause is an interaction between two or more co-existing particulars that together constitute what is called a material system in physics." Valdi Ingthorsson

" De ce fait, une cause est une interaction entre deux ou plusieurs données coexistantes qui constituent ensemble ce qu'on appelle un système matériel en physique." Valdi Ingthorsson - traduit par Google translate

Il faut retenir, à mon avis, plusieurs choses:

La causalité ne peut s'exercer que dans l'instant présent. C'est par l'évolution du système physique qu'il y a un rapport entre l'antécédent et le conséquent. Et c'est par une interaction entre les éléments du système physique qu'il y a une évolution du système physique - ce point étant d'ailleurs particulièrement important, nous pourrons en reparler plus tard, car tout part de là. Je crois que, sur ces points, nous nous rejoignions.

La question qui va se poser est celle de savoir s'il faut opter, et si vous optez, à partir de ce que vous affirmez dans cette phrase, pour une approche purement relationnelle de l'espace et du mouvement? Et, si c'est le cas, comment à partir de là retrouver l'analyse par les quatre causes?

__________

A mon avis ce point n'est pas intégré par la philosophie d'Aristote, car il n'avait pas découvert le mode d'action du Principe Moteur de l'Univers:

"Et c'est par une interaction entre les éléments du système physique qu'il y a une évolution du système physique"

Cordialement
Philippe de Bellescize



Message modifié (20-05-2018 18:19)

Répondre à ce message
 Liste des forums  |  Vue en arborescence   Nouveau sujet  |  Anciens sujets 


 Liste des forums  |  Besoin d'un identifiant ? Enregistrez-vous ici 
 Connexion
 Nom utilisateur:
 Mot de passe:
 Retenir mon login:
   
 Mot de passe oublié ?
Veuillez saisir votre adresse e-mail ou votre identifiant ci-dessous, et un nouveau mot de passe sera envoyé à l'e-mail associé à votre profil.
Page sans titre